New Issue of 19 on Victorian Sculpture

Issue 22 (2016) of 19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century is now available. Issue 22 is titled “Victorian Sculpture” and is guest edited by Angela Dunstan.

From the editor: Victorian sculpture continues to challenge us. Despite Victorian studies’ masterful readings of painting and photography, three-dimensionality demands alternative approaches to appreciate nineteenth-century sculptural aesthetics and its place in Victorian culture. The articles assembled in this issue offer innovative readings of a range of encounters with Victorian sculpture, including the role of classical statuary in Victorian women’s writing; the church sculpture of Nathaniel Hitch; Queen Victoria memorials in New Zealand; imperialism and Henry Hugh Armstead’s Outram Shield; the reflexive influence of Robert Browning’s poetic and sculptural methodologies; the photographic afterlives of Hiram Powers’s Greek Slave; and the influence of chronophotography and motion studies in the movement from neoclassical to modernist sculpture in nineteenth-century Britain. Exhibition curators provide reflections on ‘Curating Victorian Sculpture’ in the second section of the issue, offering new perspectives on sculptors Alfred Drury and John Tweed. The third section, ‘Reviewing “Sculpture Victorious”’, features reviews of each incarnation of the exhibition held at the Yale Center for British Art and at London’s Tate Britain, and David J. Getsy’s afterword considers ‘Victorian Sculpture for the Twenty-First Century’, highlighting the significance of this issue of 19 for the field.

The issue contains:

Introduction
‘Reading Victorian Sculpture’
Angela Dunstan

Reading Victorian Sculpture
‘Marmoreal Sisterhoods: Classical Statuary in Nineteenth-Century Women’s Writing’
Patricia Pulham

‘Nathaniel Hitch and the Making of Church Sculpture’
Claire Jones

‘“A token of their love”: Queen Victoria Memorials in New Zealand’
Mark Stocker

‘The Relief of Lucknow: Henry Hugh Armstead’s Outram Shield (c. 1858–62)’
Jason Edwards

‘Robert Browning, “SCULPTOR & poet”’
Vicky Greenaway

‘Photographs of Sculpture: Greek Slave’s “complex polyphony”, 1847–77’
Patrizia Di Bello

‘“A series of surfaces”: The New Sculpture and Cinema’
Rebecca Anne Sheehan

Curating Victorian Sculpture
‘Alfred Drury: The Artist as Curator’
Ben Thomas

‘Exhibiting Victorian Sculpture in Context: Display, Narrative, and Conversation in “John Tweed: Empire Sculptor, Rodin’s Friend”’
Nicola Capon

Reviewing ‘Sculpture Victorious’
‘Review of “Sculpture Victorious: Art in an Age of Invention, 1837–1901” at the Yale Center for British Art, 11 September to 20 November 2014’
Jonathan Shirland

‘Review of “Sculpture Victorious: Art in an Age of Invention, 1837–1901” at Tate Britain, 25 February to 25 May 2015’
Clare Walker Gore

Afterword
‘Afterword: Victorian Sculpture for the Twenty-First Century’
David J. Getsy

Special issue of Neo-Victorian Studies: Neo-Victorianism and Globalization

Neo-Victorian Studies has released a new special issue (8:1, 2015) titled “Neo-Victorianism and Globalization: Transnational Dissemination of Nineteenth-Century Cultural Texts,” guest-edited by Antonija Primorac and Monika Pietrzak-Franger. The issue contains the following:

Articles

 Reviews

Open calls for contributions to future issues can be found here.

Journal of Victorian Culture 20.2 (June 2015) available

The Journal of Victorian Culture‘s latest issue, 20.2 (June 2015), is now available, and contains the following:

Articles:

Perspective:

Reviews:

The issue also contains an announcement about the journal’s 201-2016 Graduate Student Essay Prize (7,000 words due 30 November 2015). More information about the prize is available at the Journal of Victorian Culture Online blog.

New Website and Manifesto: The V21 Collective

For those who have not yet seen it, the new V21 Collective, which released a manifesto on the state of Victorian studies earlier this month, has been generating a lively discussion. The collective’s manifesto diagnoses Victorian studies with a set of problems stemming from “positivist historicism,” and suggests that even new methods like surface and distant reading are symptoms of an “infatuation with the accumulation of information.”

As one might hope, a provocation of this sort is leading to a wide-ranging discussion. The first and second sets of responses are now online and open for comment.

Victorian Literature and Culture 43.1 (March 2015) available

Victorian Literature and Culture 43.1 (March 2015) is now available. It contains the following articles and reviews:

“David Masson, Belles Lettres, and a Victorian Theory of the Novel”
Jack M. Downs
doi: 10.1017/S106015031400031X

“Sincerity and Reflexive Satire in Anthony Trollope’s The Struggles of Brown, Jones and Robinson”
Matthew Titolo
doi: 10.1017/S1060150314000321

“The Realism of the Angel in the House: Coventry Patmore’s Poem Reconsidered”
Natasha Moore
doi: 10.1017/S1060150314000333

“Spencerian Evolutionary Psychology in Daniel Deronda”
Lauren Cameron
doi: 10.1017/S1060150314000345

“Yachting with Grandcourt: Gwendolen’s Mutiny in Daniel Deronda”
Kathleen McCormack
doi: 10.1017/S1060150314000357

“Sensationalism Made Real: The Role of Realism in the Production of Sensational Affect”
Janice M. Allan
doi: 10.1017/S1060150314000369

“Twilight of the Idylls: Wilde, Tennyson, and Fin-De-Siècle Anti-Idealism”
Elizabeth Carolyn Miller
doi: 10.1017/S1060150314000370

“Framing Gertrude: Photographic Narration and the Subjectivity of the Artist-Observer in Levy’s The Romance of a Shop”
David Wanczyk
doi: 10.1017/S1060150314000382

“Conrad and the Comic Turn”
Douglas Kerr
doi: 10.1017/S1060150314000394

Reviews:

“Victorians Live”
Herbert Sussman, Editor
doi: 10.1017/S1060150314000412

“New Scholarship on Victorian India”
Deborah Denenholz Morse and Virginia Butler
doi: 10.1017/S1060150314000473

“Realist Networks: Recent Work on Victorian Realism
Rebecca Thorndike-Breeze
doi: 10.1017/S1060150314000485

“2008 and All That: Economics and Victorian Literature”
Nancy Henry
doi: 10.1017/S1060150314000497

19th-century CFPs for MLA 2016 in Austin

MLA 2016 logo

Now that all calls for papers for MLA 2016 sessions are available, here is our list of sessions related to British 19th-century studies. Click through to view the session’s complete details including deadline and contact information. The full list of calls for papers is available for searching and browsing by members and non-members.

For those keeping track of periodization and its terminology, the calls for special sessions this year include four that identify themselves with “Romantic”/”Romanticism,” three “nineteenth-century,” and just one “Victorian.” Adding in those that use date ranges or focus on authors (this year just Jane Austen and William Morris) brings the count up to 7 calls on Romantic/early-19th, 4 full-century, and 4 Victorian/later-19th.

This year’s list debuts the MLA’s new organizing structure, which now consists of allied organizations, forums (formerly divisions and discussion groups), and member-organized special sessions:

Allied Organizations:

Byron Society of America
Byron and America
New scholarship related to Byron’s American reception and his own views of America and American … See more

Dickens Society
Dickens and Disability
Rethinking the “grotesques”: melodrama and sentiment, illness and care relations, cognitive and … See more

The Dickens Jukebox
Examining the use of music in Dickens’s novels: song types and styles, musical characters, role of … See more

John Clare Society of North America
After John Clare
Scholarship on any aspect of Clare’s influence on 19th, 20th, or 21st century poets and/or his … See more

Joseph Conrad Society of America
Conrad and the Body
Navigating the body in Conrad, including beautiful, grotesque, erotic(ized) bodies; the body as a … See more

Conrad’s Animals
What roles do animals play in Conrad? How does Conrad theorize the animal? What do his animals … See more

Keats-Shelley Association of America
“The Futures of Shelley’s Triumph”
What shadows of futurity does Percy Shelley’s unfinished final poem cast upon our present? New … See more

North American Society for the Study of Romanticism
The Interval in Romanticism
The space between integers; the space-time of pause, interruption, irritation, irruption. The … See more

Romantic Ecocriticism: Thinking Forward
Papers taking Romantic ecocriticism forward. Suggestions: aesthetics, forms of knowledge, new … See more

Romantic Sovereignty
Old vs. new models; sacred vs. secular; grounded/ungrounded political authority; kings/beasts; … See more

William Morris Society
Teaching William Morris
We seek papers that approach teaching Morris to reach a new generation of scholars and students, … See more

Wordsworth-Coleridge Association
Romantic Religion
Beliefs, practices, and representations of religion in the British Romantic period. Topics may … See more

Forums:

CLCS Romantic and 19th-Century
Austin in Austin: Satire, Irony and Speech Acts in Nineteenth-Century Comparative Contexts
We welcome papers addressing irony and satire as instruments and targets of political power in … See more

Romantic Readers, Nineteenth-Century Publics
Comparative papers considering the overlap or discontinuity between acts of reading and literary … See more

LLC English Romantic
Romantic Sovereignty
old v. new models; sacred v. secular; grounded/ungrounded political authority; kings/beasts; rules … See more

Romanticism, Poverty, and Impoverishment
Romantic literature and: beggars, pauperism, bare life; suffering and subsistence; economics, … See more

LLC Victorian and Early-20th-Century English
Earth
Literature/art/culture and geology, geography, sea-levels, climate, crystals, fossils, landforms … See more

Theory and Victorian Studies
Which theories and theorists, past and present, are most relevant to Victorian studies today? … See more

Victorian Intertextualities
Allusion, adaptation, rewriting, plagiarism…. How did Victorian writers use other texts? How did … See more

Special Sessions:
19th-Century Science Fiction
Papers sought on nineteenth-century science fiction; proto-science fiction; reconsiderations of … See more

Affect Studies and British Romanticism
Papers on how affect studies has redefined our understanding of the emotions in British Romantic … See more

Character in Nineteenth-Century Literature
Rethinking the narratological, cultural, and/or historical significance of literary character in … See more

Emergent Temporalities
Papers on 19th-century literary works that register new modalities of time in light of … See more

Family, Kinship & Identity in British Literature, 1750-1900
How do eighteenth and nineteenth-century literary works represent the effects of kinship networks … See more

The Objects of Performance, 1660-1830
This panel will explore the role of objects in drama and other public spectacles of the long … See more

Performing Romanticism(s)
Papers addressing how literary scholars can use performance–the stage, lectern, classroom, and … See more

Public Austens: or, Austen in Austin
Seeking papers on Jane Austen as public figure and celebrity in historical context. 250-word … See more

Queer Monsters of the British Fin de Siècle
This panel will interrogate the queer contributions of monster protagonists to fiction of the … See more

The Romantic Public
Forms, definitions, spheres, resistances, effects, legacies of “the public” – past, present, and … See more

Secularization Since Darwin in the Novel
How and to what effect does the novel since the publication of Darwin’s Origin of Species … See more

Sublime Bodies, c. 1730-1830
How did C18 and C19 authors use the discourse of the sublime to understand physicality, embodiment, … See more

Transatlantic Romantic Quotation and Romanticism
This panel will discuss the employment of (un)quoted material and/or quotation marks by British and … See more

Victorian Sensation and “Locomotive” Women
Recover female counterpart of the “locomotive man” (Nead) in Sensation fiction (1860s); … See more

William Morris and the Legacy of Socialist Aesthetics
We seek papers on socialist aesthetics in the work of Morris, his contemporaries, and successors. … See more

BAVS 2011 Conference schedule and registration (9/1-3/2011)

BAVS 2011 Conference schedule and registration (9/1-3/2011)

The program and schedule for the BAVS 2011 Conference, hosted by the University of Birmingham, are now available for viewing and downloading from our Google Docs site.

We are very excited about this wide an interdisciplinary programme, in which we are hosting around 120 papers over three days at the University of Birmingham Business School, on our Edgbaston campus. We have also schedule special sessions at the Barber Institute of Fine Arts:http://www.barber.org.uk/ and the Cadbury Research Library, home of our Special Collections: http://www.special-coll.bham.ac.uk/index.shtml

Keynote speakers are:

Overall Schedule: https://spreadsheets.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AkfTzomljON2dDV6ajNmMFIyMmdiSjFMd0czaEZCSkE&hl=en_US

Panel schedule:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1nB6XgldKTLTCvLSwfSzbJEbMh5mSc_RLSP2Q0wG85og/edit?hl=en_US

You can register for the Conference via our online shop at:http://bit.ly/oxnKHv

CFP: “Picturing the Nineteenth Century,” INCS 2012 (Kentucky, 3/22-25/2012)

INCS 2012: Picturing the Nineteenth Century

March 22-25, 2012, University of Kentucky

Update: The website for the INCS 2012 Conference, “Picturing the Nineteenth Century,” is  now available at http://incs.as.uky.edu/.

CFP: Though its title foregrounds art and visual culture, this conference will treat “picturing” in all its many senses: imagining, representing, framing, mapping. We invite papers and panels that consider how the nineteenth century represented itself to itself – through depictions of subjectivity, history, and culture; through emerging technologies and disciplines; through self-conscious “meta” attempts to understand methods of representation. We also encourage papers that consider how our own technologies and disciplines create multiple pictures of “the nineteenth century.” Interdisciplinary papers and panels are especially welcome.

Featured speakers include Nancy Armstrong (English Department, Duke University), Julie Codell (Art History Department, Arizona State University), and Shawn Michelle Smith (Visual & Critical Studies, Art Institute of Chicago).

Themes include but are not limited to

  • “The visual turn” and its technologies
  • Display, exhibition, and spectatorship
  • Cartographies, real and imagined
  • Modes of representation: narrative, image, statistics, chronology
  • Urban geographies and ethnographies; mapping and tracking people
  • Imperialism as visual practice; global mappings and re-mappings
  • Representations of selves and bodies; life writing
  • Canons, institutions, and practices of art and literature
  • The materiality of the literary: illustrations, cover designs, advertising, publication
  • Archives, libraries, and their histories
  • Digitizing the nineteenth century
  • Teaching the nineteenth century

Deadline: October 17, 2011. For individual papers, send a 250-word proposals; for panels, send individual 250-word proposals for each paper plus a 250-word panel description. Please include your name, affiliation, and e-mail address on the proposals. Accepted papers will be due in early 2012.

Contact incs2012@uky.edu for more information.

CFP: Rural Geographies of Gender and Space, Britain 1840-1920 (Warwick, Sept. 23, 2011)

Rural Geographies of Gender and Space, Britain 1840-1920 

23rd September 2011, University of Warwick

Whilst discussions of gender and space in the nineteenth-to early-twentieth century have typically focused on “women and the city”, rural spaces offer equally productive contexts for exploring the intersections between gender and space in this period. As the socio-spatial relations of the country are impacted by the move into modernity, rural environments are revealed in literary and historical texts as sites of complex, contradictory and changing gendered codes.

This half-day symposium offers a long-overdue forum in which to resituate the rural as a vital context for understanding the meanings of gender and space in this period. By bringing together scholars from different disciplinary perspectives we aim to understand the diverse experiences of gendered rural spaces and contribute to discussions about theoretical approaches to the (rural)space-gender intersection.

Proposals are invited for short papers from scholars in literary studies, history, geography, and any other discipline; postgraduate and early career researchers are especially encouraged to apply. Themes for discussion could include:

  • theories of gender and rural place: what do we mean by rural space, how do we theorise “the rural” as a spatial context, and how does gender intersect?
  • the impact of modernity;
  • mobility: walking, vagabonds, pedestrians, wayward women;
  • labour, class and gender in the country;
  • masculinities;
  • different ruralities;
  • visibility/ invisibility

Please send a 300-word proposal for 15 minute papers to the conference organisers by 15th August
Gemma.Goodman@warwick.ac.uk c.e.mathieson@warwick.ac.uk