Blackwood’s Bicentenary CFP (Romantic Bicentennials project)

The Hoarding has received notice of an upcoming event to commemorate the bicentennial of Blackwood’s Magazine. “A Blackwood’s Bicentenary: being, 36 Hours of Heady Discourse, Heated Debate, and Ambrosian Nights in Edinburgh,” will take place at the University of Edinburgh from 24-25 July, 2017 as part of the ongoing Romantic Bicentennials series. The full cfp is available here.

Romantic Bicentennials is a collaborative effort of the Keats-Shelley Association of America and the Byron Society of America. Commemorative events include annual “core symposia”: last month’s “The Geneva Summer,” 2017’s “Keats’s Emergence as a Poet,” and 2018’s “The Publication of Frankenstein.” Announced “networked events” include symposia on Manfred and the novels of 1817. Check out the full list of events, propose a new event, or follow along with the #romantics200 hashtag.

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Guest Post: The NASSR Graduate Student Caucus Blog

Hello! I’m Arden Hegele, the Managing Editor of the NASSR Graduate Student Caucus Blog, and I’m very pleased to have this opportunity to introduce our website to readers of The Hoarding.

The NGSC is a forum for graduate students in Romanticism to participate in a community beyond their institutions. We share intellectual and professional resources to help all graduate students become active and engaged scholars, and our website is a resource for involvement in Romantic studies. Any student with an interest in Romanticism can become a member of the NGSC, and can participate to whatever extent they wish.

As well as providing a supportive and collegial platform for graduate student development, the NGSC Blog is dedicated to producing innovative and exciting content for our readers in the wider scholarly community. We publish new work by graduate student writers, who come from universities across the United States and Canada, and who represent a range of programs and disciplines, but all with an interest in Romanticism.

Our feature articles include inquiries into pedagogical strategies, investigative historical work, responses to lectures, interviews with senior scholars, book reviews, close readings, and even humorous quips. I hope you’ll take a look at some of our latest pieces, which have covered such varied topics as The Lizzie Bennet Diaries, Romantic-era tattooing, Byron’s Hebrew Melodies in concert, horror in medicine, and Keats and cognitive science. We also feature articles in series, including the Dialogues collaborations and the “On First Looking Into…” posts by undergraduate writers, as well as occasional guest posts by our colleagues in related fields.

Two of our contributors deserve special notice. The NGSC Blog is extremely fortunate to be able to feature the creative work of our Artist-in-Residence, Nicole Geary, and our Poet-in-Residence, Melissa Walter. Both Nicole and Melissa’s art emerges from an ongoing dialogue with Romanticism, as they interpret and evolve early nineteenth-century aesthetics into contemporary forms.

Readers from any area or stage of the discipline are welcome, and I hope that you become a reader of the NGSC Blog. Are you a graduate student, and would you like to write for us? Our general call for new writers takes place at the beginning of the Fall term, but feel free to contact me at any time about becoming involved, and check out our Board Members page for information about joining our listserv. Thank you for reading, and all the best from the NGSC Blog!

Arden Hegele is the Managing Editor of the NGSC Blog. She is a  Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University, and a SSHRC doctoral fellow.

Romantic Materialities, a Romantic Circles PRAXIS Volume (February 2015)

Romantic Circles has announced the release of Romantic Materialities, a volume in its PRAXIS series edited by Sarah Guyer and Celeste Langan, which contains:

Keats-Shelley Journal 63 (2014)

The Keats-Shelley Journal has announced the release of volume 63 (2014), which contains:

  • “Peacock’s Lost Epilogue to Skeffington’s Lose No Time” by Nicholas A. Joukovsky
  • “A Note from Godwin to Ollier in the Year of Reform” by Rebecca Nesvet
  • “Rediscovered Shelley and Keats Manuscripts in Krakow” by Stephanie Dumke
  • “William Hilton’s Lost Drawing of Keats” by Scott McEathron
  • “The Poetry of Wandering: ‘Mont Blanc’ in History of a Six Weeks’ Tour” by Michael Erkelenz
  • “Shelley, Urbanization, and Artificial Forms of Society” by Stephen Tedeschi
  • “Passive and Dynamic Sincerity in Mary Shelley’s Falkner” by Jonas Cope
  • Celebrations of Jerrold E. Hogle and Steven E. Jones, 2014 Distinguished-Scholar awardees; reviews of ten recent scholarly books; and the Annual Bibliography of scholarship, focusing on second-generation Romantic-period writers.

The issue is available to subscribers. For subscription and renewal information, or for more information on the Keats-Shelley Association of America, visit http://k-saa.org/.

19th-century CFPs for MLA 2016 in Austin

MLA 2016 logo

Now that all calls for papers for MLA 2016 sessions are available, here is our list of sessions related to British 19th-century studies. Click through to view the session’s complete details including deadline and contact information. The full list of calls for papers is available for searching and browsing by members and non-members.

For those keeping track of periodization and its terminology, the calls for special sessions this year include four that identify themselves with “Romantic”/”Romanticism,” three “nineteenth-century,” and just one “Victorian.” Adding in those that use date ranges or focus on authors (this year just Jane Austen and William Morris) brings the count up to 7 calls on Romantic/early-19th, 4 full-century, and 4 Victorian/later-19th.

This year’s list debuts the MLA’s new organizing structure, which now consists of allied organizations, forums (formerly divisions and discussion groups), and member-organized special sessions:

Allied Organizations:

Byron Society of America
Byron and America
New scholarship related to Byron’s American reception and his own views of America and American … See more

Dickens Society
Dickens and Disability
Rethinking the “grotesques”: melodrama and sentiment, illness and care relations, cognitive and … See more

The Dickens Jukebox
Examining the use of music in Dickens’s novels: song types and styles, musical characters, role of … See more

John Clare Society of North America
After John Clare
Scholarship on any aspect of Clare’s influence on 19th, 20th, or 21st century poets and/or his … See more

Joseph Conrad Society of America
Conrad and the Body
Navigating the body in Conrad, including beautiful, grotesque, erotic(ized) bodies; the body as a … See more

Conrad’s Animals
What roles do animals play in Conrad? How does Conrad theorize the animal? What do his animals … See more

Keats-Shelley Association of America
“The Futures of Shelley’s Triumph”
What shadows of futurity does Percy Shelley’s unfinished final poem cast upon our present? New … See more

North American Society for the Study of Romanticism
The Interval in Romanticism
The space between integers; the space-time of pause, interruption, irritation, irruption. The … See more

Romantic Ecocriticism: Thinking Forward
Papers taking Romantic ecocriticism forward. Suggestions: aesthetics, forms of knowledge, new … See more

Romantic Sovereignty
Old vs. new models; sacred vs. secular; grounded/ungrounded political authority; kings/beasts; … See more

William Morris Society
Teaching William Morris
We seek papers that approach teaching Morris to reach a new generation of scholars and students, … See more

Wordsworth-Coleridge Association
Romantic Religion
Beliefs, practices, and representations of religion in the British Romantic period. Topics may … See more

Forums:

CLCS Romantic and 19th-Century
Austin in Austin: Satire, Irony and Speech Acts in Nineteenth-Century Comparative Contexts
We welcome papers addressing irony and satire as instruments and targets of political power in … See more

Romantic Readers, Nineteenth-Century Publics
Comparative papers considering the overlap or discontinuity between acts of reading and literary … See more

LLC English Romantic
Romantic Sovereignty
old v. new models; sacred v. secular; grounded/ungrounded political authority; kings/beasts; rules … See more

Romanticism, Poverty, and Impoverishment
Romantic literature and: beggars, pauperism, bare life; suffering and subsistence; economics, … See more

LLC Victorian and Early-20th-Century English
Earth
Literature/art/culture and geology, geography, sea-levels, climate, crystals, fossils, landforms … See more

Theory and Victorian Studies
Which theories and theorists, past and present, are most relevant to Victorian studies today? … See more

Victorian Intertextualities
Allusion, adaptation, rewriting, plagiarism…. How did Victorian writers use other texts? How did … See more

Special Sessions:
19th-Century Science Fiction
Papers sought on nineteenth-century science fiction; proto-science fiction; reconsiderations of … See more

Affect Studies and British Romanticism
Papers on how affect studies has redefined our understanding of the emotions in British Romantic … See more

Character in Nineteenth-Century Literature
Rethinking the narratological, cultural, and/or historical significance of literary character in … See more

Emergent Temporalities
Papers on 19th-century literary works that register new modalities of time in light of … See more

Family, Kinship & Identity in British Literature, 1750-1900
How do eighteenth and nineteenth-century literary works represent the effects of kinship networks … See more

The Objects of Performance, 1660-1830
This panel will explore the role of objects in drama and other public spectacles of the long … See more

Performing Romanticism(s)
Papers addressing how literary scholars can use performance–the stage, lectern, classroom, and … See more

Public Austens: or, Austen in Austin
Seeking papers on Jane Austen as public figure and celebrity in historical context. 250-word … See more

Queer Monsters of the British Fin de Siècle
This panel will interrogate the queer contributions of monster protagonists to fiction of the … See more

The Romantic Public
Forms, definitions, spheres, resistances, effects, legacies of “the public” – past, present, and … See more

Secularization Since Darwin in the Novel
How and to what effect does the novel since the publication of Darwin’s Origin of Species … See more

Sublime Bodies, c. 1730-1830
How did C18 and C19 authors use the discourse of the sublime to understand physicality, embodiment, … See more

Transatlantic Romantic Quotation and Romanticism
This panel will discuss the employment of (un)quoted material and/or quotation marks by British and … See more

Victorian Sensation and “Locomotive” Women
Recover female counterpart of the “locomotive man” (Nead) in Sensation fiction (1860s); … See more

William Morris and the Legacy of Socialist Aesthetics
We seek papers on socialist aesthetics in the work of Morris, his contemporaries, and successors. … See more

European Romantic Review 26.2 (April 2015) now available

The new issue of European Romantic Review, 26.2, is out. It features:

Andrew Burkett, “Photographing Byron’s Hand”

Lindsey Eckert, “Lady Caroline Lamb Beyond Byron: Graham Hamilton, Female Authorship, and the Politics of Public Reputation”

Matthew Clarke, “The ‘luxury of woe’: The Deserted Village and the Politics of Publication”

Joshua Stanley, “Wordsworth and ‘the most unhappy man of men’: Sentimentalism and Representation”

Betsy Winakur Tontiplaphol, “‘Where Pastime Only Had Been Sought’: Wordsworth at the Ballet”

Wayne Deakin, “Acknowledgment and Avoidance in Coleridge and Hölderlin”

Deanna P. Koretsky, “‘Unhallowed arts’: Frankenstein and the Poetics of Suicide”

European Romantic Review 26.1 (2015) now available

The new issue of European Romantic Review, 26.1 (2015), is out. It contains:

Susan Gustafson & Ute Berns, “Introduction: Expanding and Blurring Borders in German Romanticism”

Gail K. Hart, “Existential Muck: Romantic Borderlessness and Dissolving Dualisms in Schiller’s Die Räuber

Eleanor E. ter Horst, “The Fortuitous Arch: Reconstructing Classical and Christian Interpretations of Sexuality in Kleist’s Das Erdbeben in Chili

Jason M. Peck,Vertigo Ergo Sum: Kant, his Jewish ‘Students’ and the Origins of Romanticism”

Jonathan Blake Fine, “The Birth of Aestheticized Religion out of the Counter-Enlightenment Attraction to Catholicism”

William Davis, “One with Everything: Hölderlin on Acrocorinth”

It also contains Book Reviews by William Christie, Andrew Rudd, Friederike von Schwerin-High, Gilberta Golinelli, Maria Schoina, Wil Verhoeven, Quentin Bailey, Elizabeth A. Fay, and Christine Kenyon-Jones.