NEH Summer Seminar: Adapting Dickens, July 2011 (UC-Santa Cruz)

“Great Adaptations: Teaching Dickens through Literary and Cinematic Adaptations”

A four-week summer seminar funded by the NEH and led by Marty Gould, Assistant Professor of English at the University of South Florida.

The seminar will be Hosted by the Dickens Project at the University of California at Santa Cruz and will take place July 3rd-30th 2011.

More information about the seminar is available on the web:
http://www2.ucsc.edu/dickens/NEH.html

The seminar will explore the pedagogical potential of literary imitators. By looking at a cluster of films and narrative rewritings of two of Dickens’s most well-known novels ( A Christmas Carol and Great Expectations), the “Great Adaptations” seminar will explore the enduring influence of Dickens on the modern imagination. Taking the position that adaptations can shed fresh light on their source texts, the seminar will consider how teachers can use adaptations in the classroom, either as tools for critical investigation or as a means of student expression and assessment. A major goal of the seminar will be to help teachers identify new ways to use adaptation in the classroom in order to engage students actively in thinking and writing about literature.

The seminar is designed primarily for K-12 teachers, but graduate students with a stated interest in K-12 teaching are also warmly encouraged to apply. Seminar participants will receive a $3300 (taxable) stipend to help defray the costs of travel to Santa Cruz as well as meals and lodging for the four weeks of the seminar. For more information (including application instructions), see the Dickens Project website: http://www2.ucsc.edu/dickens/NEH.html. Specific questions can be directed to the seminar leader at mgould@usf.edu. The application deadline is 1 March 2011.

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