CFP: Victorians Institute 2011, “Charles Dickens,” Myrtle Beach, SC (October)

Call for Papers:  Victorians Institute Conference

Charles Dickens: Past, Present, and Future

October 21-22, 2011

Myrtle Beach, SC

To help usher in the global celebration of his bicentenary in 2012, the 41st annual conference of the Victorians Institute will focus rather broadly on the life and work of Charles Dickens. We welcome papers that examine Dickens’s writings and their relevance to us today.  We are particularly interested in interdisciplinary essays exploring the literary life and legacy of Dickens in relation to science, economics, psychology, sociology, philosophy, law, history, aesthetics, and theater and film adaptation.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

Dickens’s Journalism
Dickens and the Literary Marketplace
Dickens and Mass Culture
Dickensian Friendships
Dickensian Scandals
The Dickens Circle
Catherine Dickens
Dickens and Science
Dickens and Emotion
Reading Dickens
Dickensian Afterlives
Spiritualism and Spirituality in Dickens
Dickens’s Moral Philosophy
Dickens and the Posthuman
Dickens and Travel
Theatrical Dickens
Dickens in America
Dickens and Empire
The Dickens Industry
The Postmodern Dickens
Teaching Dickens

Please send proposals of no more than 500 words and a brief one-paragraph bio by June 1, 2011 to:  Dr. Maria K. Bachman, Department of English, P.O. Box 261954, Coastal Carolina University, Conway, South Carolina 29528-6054.
Email: mbachman@coastal.edu

New Issue: Victorian Literature and Culture (39:1) March 2011

 

Victorian Literature and Culture

 

Research Articles

BOY-ORPHANS, MESMERIC VILLAINS, AND FILM STARS: INSCRIBING OLIVER TWIST INTO TREASURE ISLAND

U. C. Knoepflmacher

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 01, March 2011, pp 1 – 25

DICKENS’S “JEWISH QUESTION”: PARIAH CAPITALISM AND THE WAY OUT

Deborah Epstein Nord

CONSERVATION OF ENERGY, INDIVIDUAL AGENCY, AND GOTHIC TERROR IN RICHARD MARSH’S THE BEETLE, OR, WHAT’S SCARIER THAN AN ANCIENT, EVIL, SHAPE-SHIFTING BUG?

Anna Maria Jones

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 01, March 2011, pp 65 – 85 

WRITING AS FEMALE NATIONAL AND IMPERIAL RESPONSIBILITY: FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE’S SCHEME FOR SOCIAL AND CULTURAL REFORMS IN ENGLAND AND INDIA

Chieko Ichikawa

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 01, March 2011, pp 87 – 105 

BODIES OF SCHOLARSHIP: WITNESSING THE LIBRARY IN LATE-VICTORIAN FICTION

Daniel Cook

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 01, March 2011, pp 107 – 125 

THE DEAD STILL AMONG US: VICTORIAN SECULAR RELICS, HAIR JEWELRY, AND DEATH CULTURE

Deborah Lutz

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 01, March 2011, pp 127 – 142 

GEORGE EGERTON’S KEYNOTES: NIETZSCHEAN FEMINISM AND FIN-DE-SIÈCLE FETISHISM

Daniel Brown

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 01, March 2011, pp 143 – 166

A LIFE IN FRAGMENTS: THOMAS COOPER’S CHARTIST BILDUNGSROMAN

Gregory Vargo

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 01, March 2011, pp 167 – 181

“LIKE BOTTLED WASPS”: BEERBOHM, HUYSMANS, AND THE DECADENTS’ SUBURBAN RETREAT

Mary Elizabeth Curtin

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 01, March 2011, pp 183 – 200 

Work In Progress

NARRATING INSANITY IN THE LETTERS OF THOMAS MULOCK AND DINAH MULOCK CRAIK

Karen Bourrier

LITTLE BUILDERS: CORAL INSECTS, MISSIONARY CULTURE, AND THE VICTORIAN CHILD

Michelle Elleray

MALIGNANT FAITH AND COGNITIVE RESTRUCTURING: REALISM IN ADAM BEDE

Jon Singleton

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 01, March 2011, pp 239 – 260

 

Review Essay

DIGITAL SCHOLARLY RESOURCES FOR THE STUDY OF VICTORIAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE

Andrew M. Stauffer

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 01, March 2011, pp 293 – 303

NEH Summer Seminar: Adapting Dickens, July 2011 (UC-Santa Cruz)

“Great Adaptations: Teaching Dickens through Literary and Cinematic Adaptations”

A four-week summer seminar funded by the NEH and led by Marty Gould, Assistant Professor of English at the University of South Florida.

The seminar will be Hosted by the Dickens Project at the University of California at Santa Cruz and will take place July 3rd-30th 2011.

More information about the seminar is available on the web:
http://www2.ucsc.edu/dickens/NEH.html

The seminar will explore the pedagogical potential of literary imitators. By looking at a cluster of films and narrative rewritings of two of Dickens’s most well-known novels ( A Christmas Carol and Great Expectations), the “Great Adaptations” seminar will explore the enduring influence of Dickens on the modern imagination. Taking the position that adaptations can shed fresh light on their source texts, the seminar will consider how teachers can use adaptations in the classroom, either as tools for critical investigation or as a means of student expression and assessment. A major goal of the seminar will be to help teachers identify new ways to use adaptation in the classroom in order to engage students actively in thinking and writing about literature.

The seminar is designed primarily for K-12 teachers, but graduate students with a stated interest in K-12 teaching are also warmly encouraged to apply. Seminar participants will receive a $3300 (taxable) stipend to help defray the costs of travel to Santa Cruz as well as meals and lodging for the four weeks of the seminar. For more information (including application instructions), see the Dickens Project website: http://www2.ucsc.edu/dickens/NEH.html. Specific questions can be directed to the seminar leader at mgould@usf.edu. The application deadline is 1 March 2011.

New Interdisciplinary MA in 19th-C Studies at King’s College London

Studying the Nineteenth Century at King’s College in the heart of London

The MA in Nineteenth-Century Studies at King’s College London is a new interdisciplinary degree that focuses on the history, literature, visual culture, built environment and legacy of the nineteenth-century world.  Taught by specialists from History, English and Geography, the programme offers an exceptionally wide range of modules. Students take a core module called Doing Nineteenth-Century Studies, which introduces a range of topics and concepts based on themes such as “nation, state and empire”, “the country and the city”, and “representing the nineteenth century”. They also complete a 15,000 word research dissertation and can choose from more than 15 optional modules. Students can also work as an intern with key cultural and heritage organisations in London including English Heritage, the National Maritime Museum, the Museum of London Archaeology Service, the Post Office Museum and the Royal College of Surgeons Hunterian Museum.  These internship projects are counted as part of the degree.

One bursary of £6000 is available for applicants intending to enter the degree in 2011.

To apply please visit our website at
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/prospectus/graduate/nineteenth_century_studies/details

For any questions please contact Dr Niall O’Flaherty by email at niall.o’flaherty@kcl.ac.uk

New Issue: Victorian Poetry (48:4), Winter 2010, on Sonnets

Table of Contents

New Issue: English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920 (54:2), 2011

Table of Contents

Articles

Fictional Medical Women and Moral Therapy in the Late-Nineteenth Century: Daughters of Aesculapius, Mothers to All
pp. 139-164
Edwardian Transitions in the Fiction of Una L. Silberrad
pp. 212-233

Book Reviews

Concerning E. M. Forster (review)
pp. 234-236
Posting It: The Victorian Revolution in Letter Writing (review)
pp. 236-240
Gerard Manley Hopkins: A Life (review)
pp. 240-243
Leonard Merrick: A Forgotten Novelist’s Novelist (review)
pp. 243-247
Robert Louis Stevenson and Joseph Conrad: Writers of Transition (review)
pp. 247-250
British Aestheticism and Ancient Greece: Hellenism, Reception, Gods in Exile (review)
pp. 250-254
Broadcasting Modernism (review)
pp. 254-258
Joseph Conrad in Context (review)
pp. 258-261
Conrad and History (review)
pp. 262-263