On 19th-Century Literary Scholarship

Archive for February, 2011|Monthly archive page

CFP: Victorians Institute 2011, “Charles Dickens,” Myrtle Beach, SC (October)

In Conferences on February 23, 2011 at 2:52 pm

Call for Papers:  Victorians Institute Conference

Charles Dickens: Past, Present, and Future

October 21-22, 2011

Myrtle Beach, SC

To help usher in the global celebration of his bicentenary in 2012, the 41st annual conference of the Victorians Institute will focus rather broadly on the life and work of Charles Dickens. We welcome papers that examine Dickens’s writings and their relevance to us today.  We are particularly interested in interdisciplinary essays exploring the literary life and legacy of Dickens in relation to science, economics, psychology, sociology, philosophy, law, history, aesthetics, and theater and film adaptation.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

Dickens’s Journalism
Dickens and the Literary Marketplace
Dickens and Mass Culture
Dickensian Friendships
Dickensian Scandals
The Dickens Circle
Catherine Dickens
Dickens and Science
Dickens and Emotion
Reading Dickens
Dickensian Afterlives
Spiritualism and Spirituality in Dickens
Dickens’s Moral Philosophy
Dickens and the Posthuman
Dickens and Travel
Theatrical Dickens
Dickens in America
Dickens and Empire
The Dickens Industry
The Postmodern Dickens
Teaching Dickens

Please send proposals of no more than 500 words and a brief one-paragraph bio by June 1, 2011 to:  Dr. Maria K. Bachman, Department of English, P.O. Box 261954, Coastal Carolina University, Conway, South Carolina 29528-6054.
Email: mbachman@coastal.edu

Guide to Digital Scholarly Resources for the Study of Victorian Literature

In Digital resources on February 23, 2011 at 1:38 pm

The most recent issue of Victorian Literature and Culture (39:1; March 2011) contains a review essay or guide I wrote outlining the available digital scholarly resources for the study of Victorian literature.

That guide is available in full text here,  with live links to the relevant material.

New Issue: Victorian Literature and Culture (39:1) March 2011

In Articles on February 23, 2011 at 11:53 am

 

Victorian Literature and Culture

 

Research Articles

BOY-ORPHANS, MESMERIC VILLAINS, AND FILM STARS: INSCRIBING OLIVER TWIST INTO TREASURE ISLAND

U. C. Knoepflmacher

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 01, March 2011, pp 1 – 25

DICKENS’S “JEWISH QUESTION”: PARIAH CAPITALISM AND THE WAY OUT

Deborah Epstein Nord

CONSERVATION OF ENERGY, INDIVIDUAL AGENCY, AND GOTHIC TERROR IN RICHARD MARSH’S THE BEETLE, OR, WHAT’S SCARIER THAN AN ANCIENT, EVIL, SHAPE-SHIFTING BUG?

Anna Maria Jones

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 01, March 2011, pp 65 – 85 

WRITING AS FEMALE NATIONAL AND IMPERIAL RESPONSIBILITY: FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE’S SCHEME FOR SOCIAL AND CULTURAL REFORMS IN ENGLAND AND INDIA

Chieko Ichikawa

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 01, March 2011, pp 87 – 105 

BODIES OF SCHOLARSHIP: WITNESSING THE LIBRARY IN LATE-VICTORIAN FICTION

Daniel Cook

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 01, March 2011, pp 107 – 125 

THE DEAD STILL AMONG US: VICTORIAN SECULAR RELICS, HAIR JEWELRY, AND DEATH CULTURE

Deborah Lutz

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 01, March 2011, pp 127 – 142 

GEORGE EGERTON’S KEYNOTES: NIETZSCHEAN FEMINISM AND FIN-DE-SIÈCLE FETISHISM

Daniel Brown

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 01, March 2011, pp 143 – 166

A LIFE IN FRAGMENTS: THOMAS COOPER’S CHARTIST BILDUNGSROMAN

Gregory Vargo

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 01, March 2011, pp 167 – 181

“LIKE BOTTLED WASPS”: BEERBOHM, HUYSMANS, AND THE DECADENTS’ SUBURBAN RETREAT

Mary Elizabeth Curtin

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 01, March 2011, pp 183 – 200 

Work In Progress

NARRATING INSANITY IN THE LETTERS OF THOMAS MULOCK AND DINAH MULOCK CRAIK

Karen Bourrier

LITTLE BUILDERS: CORAL INSECTS, MISSIONARY CULTURE, AND THE VICTORIAN CHILD

Michelle Elleray

MALIGNANT FAITH AND COGNITIVE RESTRUCTURING: REALISM IN ADAM BEDE

Jon Singleton

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 01, March 2011, pp 239 – 260

 

Review Essay

DIGITAL SCHOLARLY RESOURCES FOR THE STUDY OF VICTORIAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE

Andrew M. Stauffer

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 01, March 2011, pp 293 – 303

NEH Summer Seminar: Adapting Dickens, July 2011 (UC-Santa Cruz)

In Events on February 21, 2011 at 5:51 pm

“Great Adaptations: Teaching Dickens through Literary and Cinematic Adaptations”

A four-week summer seminar funded by the NEH and led by Marty Gould, Assistant Professor of English at the University of South Florida.

The seminar will be Hosted by the Dickens Project at the University of California at Santa Cruz and will take place July 3rd-30th 2011.

More information about the seminar is available on the web:
http://www2.ucsc.edu/dickens/NEH.html

The seminar will explore the pedagogical potential of literary imitators. By looking at a cluster of films and narrative rewritings of two of Dickens’s most well-known novels ( A Christmas Carol and Great Expectations), the “Great Adaptations” seminar will explore the enduring influence of Dickens on the modern imagination. Taking the position that adaptations can shed fresh light on their source texts, the seminar will consider how teachers can use adaptations in the classroom, either as tools for critical investigation or as a means of student expression and assessment. A major goal of the seminar will be to help teachers identify new ways to use adaptation in the classroom in order to engage students actively in thinking and writing about literature.

The seminar is designed primarily for K-12 teachers, but graduate students with a stated interest in K-12 teaching are also warmly encouraged to apply. Seminar participants will receive a $3300 (taxable) stipend to help defray the costs of travel to Santa Cruz as well as meals and lodging for the four weeks of the seminar. For more information (including application instructions), see the Dickens Project website: http://www2.ucsc.edu/dickens/NEH.html. Specific questions can be directed to the seminar leader at mgould@usf.edu. The application deadline is 1 March 2011.

New Interdisciplinary MA in 19th-C Studies at King’s College London

In Uncategorized on February 21, 2011 at 5:47 pm

Studying the Nineteenth Century at King’s College in the heart of London

The MA in Nineteenth-Century Studies at King’s College London is a new interdisciplinary degree that focuses on the history, literature, visual culture, built environment and legacy of the nineteenth-century world.  Taught by specialists from History, English and Geography, the programme offers an exceptionally wide range of modules. Students take a core module called Doing Nineteenth-Century Studies, which introduces a range of topics and concepts based on themes such as “nation, state and empire”, “the country and the city”, and “representing the nineteenth century”. They also complete a 15,000 word research dissertation and can choose from more than 15 optional modules. Students can also work as an intern with key cultural and heritage organisations in London including English Heritage, the National Maritime Museum, the Museum of London Archaeology Service, the Post Office Museum and the Royal College of Surgeons Hunterian Museum.  These internship projects are counted as part of the degree.

One bursary of £6000 is available for applicants intending to enter the degree in 2011.

To apply please visit our website at
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/prospectus/graduate/nineteenth_century_studies/details

For any questions please contact Dr Niall O’Flaherty by email at niall.o’flaherty@kcl.ac.uk

New Issue: Victorian Poetry (48:4), Winter 2010, on Sonnets

In Articles on February 14, 2011 at 11:46 pm

Table of Contents

New Issue: English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920 (54:2), 2011

In Articles on February 14, 2011 at 11:44 pm

Table of Contents

Articles

Fictional Medical Women and Moral Therapy in the Late-Nineteenth Century: Daughters of Aesculapius, Mothers to All
pp. 139-164
Edwardian Transitions in the Fiction of Una L. Silberrad
pp. 212-233

Book Reviews

Concerning E. M. Forster (review)
pp. 234-236
Posting It: The Victorian Revolution in Letter Writing (review)
pp. 236-240
Gerard Manley Hopkins: A Life (review)
pp. 240-243
Leonard Merrick: A Forgotten Novelist’s Novelist (review)
pp. 243-247
Robert Louis Stevenson and Joseph Conrad: Writers of Transition (review)
pp. 247-250
British Aestheticism and Ancient Greece: Hellenism, Reception, Gods in Exile (review)
pp. 250-254
Broadcasting Modernism (review)
pp. 254-258
Joseph Conrad in Context (review)
pp. 258-261
Conrad and History (review)
pp. 262-263

NVSA 2011 Conference: “Systems and Archives” at UMaryland: Program

In Conferences on February 9, 2011 at 12:02 pm

Below is the program for the upcoming Northeastern Victorian Studies Association conference at the University of Maryland, April 15-17, 2011, also available here.

NVSA CONFERENCE: “SYSTEMS AND ARCHIVES”

Program

All panels and the pre-conference session will take place in Ulrich Recital Hall, located on the first floor of Tawes Hall. Download a UMD campus map here.

Friday, April 15

2:00-4:30 p.m. Registration (Tawes Hall foyer)

3:00-4:15 p.m. Special Pre-conference Session: Martha Nell Smith (U Maryland), Moderator

• Andrew Stauffer (U of Virginia), “Digital Archives and Victorian Studies”: A seminar on NINES and other digital resources for nineteenth-century scholarship. All are welcome: no pre-registration required.

4:15 p.m. Welcome

4:30-6:00 p.m. Systems of Literary Criticism: Anna Henchman (Boston U), Moderator

• Evan Horowitz (Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study), “Victoriametrics: A Systematic Criticism?”
• Jonathan Farina (Seton Hall U), “The Gay System and the Archive of Pleasure”
• Allison Wee (California Lutheran U), “The Victorian Home Office: Defining Literary Obscenity Ob Skene
• John MacNeill Miller (Rutgers U), “As Chancery Would Have It: Fighting Systematic Paranoia in Bleak House

6:00-7:00 p.m. Welcome Reception, co-sponsored with the Georgetown Department of English (Tawes Hall roof deck)

7:00-9:00 p.m. Optional dinner off-campus; buses will transport participants to and from Tiffin, a local Indian restaurant (advance reservations required).

 

Saturday, April 16

Book Exhibit (Tawes 2115, open all day)

8:00-9:00 a.m. Breakfast and Registration (Tawes Hall foyer)

9:00-11:00 a.m. Keynote Panel: George Levine (Rutgers U), Moderator

• Bernard Lightman (York U)
• Paul Saint-Amour (U of Pennsylvania)
• Catherine Robson (NYU)
• Nicholas Daly (University College Dublin)

11:00-11:15 a.m. Coffee break

11:15 a.m.-12:45 p.m. Archives—Definitions/Limits: Eileen Gillooly (Columbia U), Moderator

• Christopher Keep (U of Western Ontario), “An Aversion to Records: Information and the Mid-Victorian Archive Crisis”
• Michael Riordan (Oxford U), “‘A Great Republic of Workers’: Stubbs, Selection, and the Organization of Victorian Archives”
• Marjorie Stone (Dalhousie U), “The Archival Turn, Victorian Poetical Manuscripts, and the Thomas Wise Forgeries”

1:00-2:30 p.m. Lunch (Stamp Student Union, Prince George’s Room)

The NVSA business lunch, a convivial event at which topics are proposed and voted on for the following year, is a long-standing tradition; everyone is warmly encouraged to attend and participate.

2:45-4:15 p.m. Disciplines: Jonathan Loesberg (American U), Moderator

• Alice Jenkins (U of Glasgow), “Deductive Systems: Euclidean Geometry and Victorian Interdisciplinarity”
• Devin Griffiths (U of Pennsylvania), “Pairing the Past with Owen and Arnold: Comparative Method and Victorian Historiography”
• Michael Klotz (Wake Forest U), “Manufacturing Fictional Persons: The Victorian Novel and the System of Social Statistics”

4:15-4:30 p.m. Coffee break

4:30-6:00 p.m. Scientific Systems: Rachel Ablow (SUNY Buffalo), Moderator

• Vanessa Ryan (Brown U), “Close Thy Darwin, Open Thy Spencer: Towards a Systems Theory of the Mind”
• Erika Behrisch Elce (Royal Military College of Canada), “‘Enlightened Zeal’: Systematizing Amateur Science in the Admiralty’s Manual of Scientific Enquiry, 1849”
• Katherine E. Young (U Maryland), “Mary Anning’s Monster: Science, Spectacle, and the Plesiosaur”

6:15-6:45 p.m. Reception (Stamp Student Union, Prince George’s Room)

6:45-8:00 p.m. Dinner Banquet

8:00 p.m. Victorian Magic ShowEric Henning, an award-winning magician and historian of magic will perform from his repertoire of nineteenth-century magic.

 

Sunday, April 17

Book Exhibit (Tawes 2115, open all day)

8:00-9:00 a.m. Breakfast

9:00-10:30 a.m. Archive, System, & Materiality: Mary Wilson Carpenter (Queens U), Moderator

• Veronica Alfano (Princeton U), “Systems of Discontinuity: Photography, Fin de Siècle Poetics, and the Digitization of Transience”
• Janice Schroeder (Carleton), “His Master’s Voice: Schoolroom Writing and the Archiving of Children’s Spoken Words”
• Caroline Lieffers (Independent Scholar), “Managed Meals: Systematizing Nineteenth-Century Middle-Class Cookery”
• David Pike (American U), “The Victorian Street in Space and Time”

10:30-10:45 a.m. Coffee break

10:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Systems & Archives of Race & Empire: Aaron Worth (Boston U), Moderator

• Sebastian Lecourt (Yale U), “Richard Burton in the Body of the Believer”
• Jessica Ratcliff (U of Illinois), “The Observatory Archive: Constructing a Universal Science in the Age of European Imperialism”
• Greg Vargo (City College), “‘A double-barrelled infernal machine’: The Colonial System in the Chartist Archive”

12:15-1:00 p.m. Conference Wrap-Up

• Amanda Claybaugh (Harvard U)
• William Cohen (U of Maryland)

MLA 2012: Romantic and Victorian CFPs

In Conferences on February 3, 2011 at 3:55 pm

Below are some of the MLA 2012 CFPs relevant to Romantic and Victorian studies.  The next convention will be held in Seattle, Jan 5-8, 2012.

 

Romantic Division

“This is not a Thing:  Rethinking Romantic Materiality.”  Papers on the difference “things” make to Romantic thinking; differences between people, ideas, and things; airy nothings, fluid things, solid things, things of beauty. 250-350 word abstracts to clangan@berkeley.edu by 15 March.

 

“Romantic Number(s)”: Papers on any dimension of number–counts; accountings; denomination; metrical numbers; serial numbers; cardinal and ordinal number; seriality; crowds; singularities; multitudes; populations; of being numerous; of being single, double, triple; digital and analog romanticisms; romantic zeros, infinities, algorithms, differentials; romantic mathesis. 250-350 word abstracts to maureen.mclane@nyu.edu <mailto:maureen.mclane@nyu.edu> by 15 March.

 

Byron Society of America

Lord Byron: Poetry in Manuscript, Poetry in Print

The function of manuscript and print in Byron’s poems; relations between handwritten and printed inscription. Topics: circulation, proofreading, printing; punctuation, capitalization, spelling, etc. 250-word abstracts by 8 March 2011; Gary Dyer (g.dyer28@csuohio.edu)

William Morris Society

Pre-Raphaelite Audiences: Artists, Critics, Readers

We seek papers on audience response to the writings or artistry of the Pre-Raphaelites and their circle: reviews, illsurations, reader responses, or later adaptations. abstracts or proposals by 15 March 2011; Florence S. Boos (florence-boos@uiowa.edu) and Gregory Branhisel (barnhiselg@duq.edu)

North American Society for the Study of Romanticism

History: Discipline or Counterscience?

Theories of history in European or British Romantic philosophy, literature, thought; history as organizational model and/or dangerous supplement in aesthetics, life-sciences; other disciplines’ impact on historiography. 500 word abstracts by 8 March 2011; Tilottama Rajan (trajan@sympatico.ca)

Wordsworth-Coleridge Association

Romantic Comedy, Romantic Play

Essays should examine comedy as dramatic genre, gambling, sports, children’s games, amateur theatricals, satire, caricature, imagination as play, and/or the influence of Schiller’s Spieltrieb in British Romantic literature. Abstracts by 15 March 2011; James C. McKusick (james.mckusick@umontana.edu).

Society for the History of Authorship, Reading, and Publishing

Radical Print Culture

Historical studies of/theoretical insights into the use of print and printing (or other reproduction technologies such as mimeographs or photocopies) by radical political or social movements. abstracts (250 words) by 1 March 2011; Trysh Travis (ttravis@ufl.edu) and Greg Barnhisel (barnhiselg@duq.edu).

Nineteenth-Century American Literature

Principles of Exclusion: The Future of the Nineteenth-Century Archive

How does exclusion shape the digital archive despite its emphasis on total access? Who decides what gets left out–and how? Abstracts (1-2 p.); cvs. by 10 March 2011; Lloyd Pratt (prattl@msu.edu)

The Victorian Period

Ethics and Literary Experience

We seek papers discussing/theorizing/critiquing the experience-the affective responses; identifications and resistances; imagined political, aesthetic, intellectual, and moral stakes, investments, and implications–of reading Victorian literature(s) ethically. 250-350 word abstracts by 15 March 2011; Eileen Gillooly (eg48@columbia.edu).

Evidence

What counts as evidence varies historically, disciplinarily, epistemologically. We seek proposals that address the question of evidence within the Victorian Period and/or reflect upon our own evidentiary practices. 250-350 word abstracts by 15 March 2011; Eileen Gillooly (eg48@columbia.edu).

SPECIAL SESSIONS:

The Brontë Sisters in Other Wor(l)ds

All aspects of The Brontë Sisters as transcreated in languages other than English and/or as received in different sociocultural contexts. 300-word abstract and short vitae by 1 March 2011; Shouhua Qi (qis@wcsu.edu)

Literacy and the Victorian Gothic

Scenes of acquired literacy and literary indoctrination abound in nineteenth-century Gothic plots. How does literacy relate to the Gothic conventions of autodidacticism, self-transformation, transgression, and otherworldly possession? Abstracts by 11 March 2011; Bonita Rhoads (rhoads@phil.muni.cz)

Michael Field and the Arts

This panel analyzes the influence music, theatre, and art had on the construction of Michael Field’s dramas, verse, and diaries. 300 word abstract and one page CV by 5 March 2011; Donna S. Parsons (donna-parsons@uiowa.edu).

The Poetry of George Meredith

2012 marks the sesquicentennial of the publication of “Modern Love”; proposals on topics related to “Modern Love,” or Meredith’s verse more broadly, are welcome. Abstracts of 250-300 words by 10 March 2011; Rebecca Mitchell (rnmitchell@gmail.com).

Romantic Agrarian Politics

Rethinking connections between Romantic authors and agrarian resistance(s) to encroachment, dispossession, and enslavement. Transatlantic studies are especially welcome. 250 to 500-word abstracts by 10 March 2011; Michael Demson (mtd007@shsu.edu).

The Romantic Novel in/and Theory

What can Romantic-era novels tell us about the theoretical stakes of modern literature? Conversely, what can contemporary theory help us understand about the Romantic novel? 300-500 word abstracts by 15 March 2011; Evan M. Gottlieb (evan.gottlieb@oregonstate.edu).

Romanticism & Science: New Approaches

New studies on the relationship between Romantic Literature, Philosophy, and the Sciences in the early 1800s. Transcultural approaches welcome. Short CV, 250-word abstracts by 1 March 2011; Stefan Hoeppner (stefan.hoeppner@germanistik.uni-freiburg.de).

CFP: “Sex, Courtship, and Marriage in Victorian Popular Culture,” London, July 2011

In Conferences on February 3, 2011 at 11:19 am

Victorian Popular Fiction Association
3rd Annual Conference, 18th & 19th July 2011
Institute for English Studies, University of London

Theme:  Sex, Courtship and Marriage in Victorian Popular Culture

Keynote speakers: Andrew King (Canterbury Christ Church University) and Jennifer Phegley (University of Missouri-Kansas City)

After our very successful conferences of 2009 and 2010 the Victorian Popular Fiction Association announces its third annual conference to be held 18th – 19th July 2011.

The  themes we would like to develop are ideas of sex, courtship and marriage, and the ways in which they are explored and represented in Victorian popular culture. This theme enables us to develop our interdisciplinary interests in nineteenth-century culture, and our understanding of the many and varied attitudes towards relationships throughout the Victorian period.

We are pleased to announce that our keynote speakers will be Jennifer Phegley and Andrew King, both of whom will be addressing aspects of the conference theme.

Papers relevant to the conference theme may be drawn from any aspect of Victorian popular culture and may address literal or metaphorical representations of the theme.

We remain committed to promoting research in any aspect of Victorian popular fiction, and the revival of interest in understudied male and female popular writers from this period will again be pivotal to this conference, as we look to build on the foundations we established at our conferences in 2009 and 2010.  We invite proposals for 20 minute research papers on any aspect of the above theme.  Topics might include, but are not restricted to:

•       Sex and marriage in the periodical press
•       The circulating libraries and their attitude to sex and marriage in Victorian fiction
•       Sex and marriage on the Victorian stage
•       Social codes governing courtship
•       Courtship protocol and etiquette
•       Physical relationships and intimacy
•       Sex, marriage and emigration
•       Taboos related to sex, courtship or marriage
•       Sex, marriage and death
•       Medical attitudes towards sex and marriage
•       Unconventional or transgressive relationships
•       Marital harmony and the professional man or woman
•       Representations of divorce, separation or the legal position of married women in popular culture.

Postgraduate students are particularly welcome.

Please send abstracts of no more than 200 words to either Jane Jordan (j.jordan@kingston.ac.uk) or Greta Depledge (depledgeg@aol.com) by: Thursday 31st March 2011.

For further information about the Victorian Popular Fiction Association, see:
http://fass.kingston.ac.uk/research/victorian/

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