On 19th-Century Literary Scholarship

New Issue: Romanticism and Victorianism on the Net: “Victorian Studies and its Publics”

In Articles on September 28, 2010 at 10:14 am

Romanticism and Victorianism on the Net #55 (August 2009):

“Victorian Studies and its Publics”

ed. Linda K. Hughes (Texas Christian University, Fort Worth):

Introduction

Articles:

Russell M. Wyland (National Endowment for the Humanities): ‘Public Funding and the “Untamed Wilderness” of Victorian Studies
Laurel Brake (Birkbeck, University of London): ‘Tacking: Nineteenth-Century Print Culture and its Readers
Anne Helmreich (Case Western Reserve University): ‘Victorian Exhibition Culture: The Market Then and the Museum Today
Margaret Stetz (University of Delaware): ‘“Would You Like Some Victorian Dressing with That?”
Miriam Bailin (Washington University): ‘A Community of Interest—Victorian Scholars and Literary Societies
Regenia Gagnier (University of Exeter): ‘Victorian Studies’ International Publics: The California Dickens and Global Circulation Projects
Teresa Mangum (University of Iowa): ‘The Many Lives of Victorian Fiction
Carol Christ (Smith College): ‘Victorian Studies and its Publics

Book Reviews:

Anthony Jarrells (University of South Carolina): ‘David Simpson. Wordsworth, Commodification and Social Concern: The Poetics of Modernity
Ian Dennis (University of Ottawa): ‘Cheryl A. Wilson, ed. Byron: Heritage and Legacy
Patrick Madden (Brigham Young University): ‘Denise Gigante. The Great Age of the English Essay
Ihsen Hachaichi (Université de Montréal): ‘Andrew Bennett. Wordsworth Writing
Noel Jackson (Massachusetts Institute of Technology): ‘Jeffrey C. Robinson. Unfettering Poetry: Fancy in British Romanticism
Jeffrey W. Barbeau (Wheaton College): ‘Nicholas Reid. Coleridge, Form and Symbol, or The Ascertaining Vision
Caroline Levine (University of Wisconsin-Madison): ‘Kate Flint. The Transatlantic Indian, 1776-1930
Julia F. Saville (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign): ‘Herbert F. Tucker. Epic: Britain’s Heroic Muse 1790-1910
Georgina O’Brien Hill (University of Chester): ‘Laurel Brake and Marysa Demoor, eds. DNCJ: Dictionary of Nineteenth-Century Journalism in Great Britain and Ireland
Elsie B. Michie (Louisiana State University): ‘Linda H. Peterson. Becoming a Woman of Letters: Myths of Authorship and Facts of the Victorian Market
Paul Sawyer (Cornell University): ‘Jason Camlot. Style and the Nineteenth-Century British Critic: Sincere Mannerisms
Gordon Bigelow (Rhodes College): ‘Margaret Marwick, Deborah Denenholz Morse, and Regenia Gagnier, eds. The Politics of Gender in Anthony Trollope’s Novels: New Readings for the Twenty-First Century
Roberto Dainotto (Duke University): ‘Chenxi Tang. The Geographic Imagination of Modernity: Geography, Literature, and Philosophy in German Romanticism
Constance Hassett (Fordham University): ‘Suzanne Waldman. The Demon and the Damozel: Dynamics of Desire in the Works of Christina Rossetti and Dante Gabriel Rossetti
Herbert Sussman (The New School): ‘Trev Lynn Broughton and Helen Rogers, eds. Gender and Fatherhood in the Nineteenth Century
Kathleen Callanan Martin (Boston University): ‘Ellen Bayuk Rosenman, and Claudia C. Klaver, eds. Other Mothers: Beyond the Maternal Ideal
Miriam Elizabeth Burstein (College at Brockport, State University of New York): ‘Maria LaMonaca. Masked Atheism: Catholicism and the Secular Victorian Home
Zia Miric (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign): ‘Nadia Valman. The Jewess in Nineteenth-Century British Literary Culture
Daniel Wong (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign): ‘Victoria Morgan and Clare Williams, eds. Shaping Belief: Culture, Politics and Religion in Nineteenth-Century Writing
Lorna Hardwick (The Open University, UK): ‘Shanyn Fiske. Heretical Hellenism: Women Writers, Ancient Greece and the Victorian Popular Imagination
Ruth Livesey (University of London): ‘Spellbound, George Gissing. Volume I: The Storyteller; Volume II: A Twenty-First Century Reappraisal
Andrea Goulet (University of Pennsylvania): ‘Chris Otter. The Victorian Eye: A Political History of Light and Vision in Britain, 1800-1910
Margaret Cohen (Stanford University): ‘Anne-Lise François. Open Secrets: The Literature of Uncounted Experience

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