On 19th-Century Literary Scholarship

Archive for August, 2011|Monthly archive page

CFP: “Taking Liberties: Sex, Pleasure, Coercion 1748-1928″ (Newcastle, June 2012)

In Conferences on August 30, 2011 at 12:53 pm

Call for Papers

Taking Liberties: Sex, Pleasure, Coercion (1748-1928)

15-17 June 2012, Newcastle University

  

Keynote Speakers:

 

Helen Berry (Newcastle University) on Sex, Marriage and the Castrato

Joseph Bristow (UCLA) on Oscar Wilde’s Sexual Practices

Cora Kaplan (Queen Mary, University of London) on Rape, Representation and Slavery

Richard C. Sha (American University) on Romanticism and the Paradoxes of Free Love

 

From the publication of John Cleland’s Fanny Hill (1748) to D.H. Lawrence’s Lady Chatterley’s Lover (1928), literature has imaginatively exploited the relationship between freedom, coercion and sexual pleasure, constantly pushing at the boundaries of what it is permissible to describe, represent and perform. At the same time, the history of print, film and theatre censorship has been told as a story of progressive unshackling from constraint. In this narrative, these ever-widening freedoms and challenges have been understood as positively beneficial to individuals and to societies. Yet the idea of sexual liberty as an unqualified good has increasingly come under scrutiny, giving way to the realization that freedom from sexual constraint can sometimes mean imprisonment in new and alternate structures of power, frustration and denial. This international, multidisciplinary conference seeks to complicate and enrich our understanding of the relation between sex, pleasure and coercion in a liberal context. It will explore the many ways in which literary and visual texts and performances can be understood to create, reinforce, question and/or dissolve these structures, as well as interrogate the complicity of publishing and the law in their framing and dismantling.

 

Key conference questions are:

  • How are the complex relations between sexual licence, pleasure and coercion understood, represented and negotiated during the long nineteenth century?
  • How did censorship and obscenity laws shape the literary/cinematic/theatrical landscape?
  • How were sexually controversial texts – from erotica to triple-decker novels, from peep-shows to West-End theatre – produced, circulated, preserved and consumed?

We are interested in literary and visual texts/performances from across the cultural spectrum. We welcome papers from English, Drama, Film & Visual Culture, History, Law, Modern Languages, Sociology and Geography.

Possible topics include:

  • Sex, Sexuality and the Law
  • Gender and the Law
  • Obscenity/Pornography
  • Censorship
  • Rakes/Dandies/Mollies
  • Prostitutes/Madams/Pimps
  • Rape/Sexual Violence
  • Sex on Stage/Screen
  • Sex Manuals/Diaries
  • ‘Lewd’ Behaviour
  • The Politics of Pleasure
  • Flirtation, Seduction, Exploitation
  • Corrupting the Innocent
  • Voyeurism/Striptease/Burlesque
  • ‘Dirty’ Books
  • Bowdlerization
  • Advertising Sex/Abortion/Contraception
  • Sexual Initiations
  • Sadomasochism/Masters and Slaves
  • Tyranny and Slavery

Proposals of up to 300 words should be emailed by 1 November 2011 to TakingLiberties@ncl.ac.uk. Other inquiries should be directed to Dr Ella Dzelzainis at ella.dzelzainis@ncl.ac.uk.

The conference is organized at Newcastle University by the Long Nineteenth Century Research Group (School of English), with the support of the Gender Research Group and the Newcastle Institute for the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities.

 

CFP: VSAWC Conference, “Victorian Media,” (Victoria, British Columbia, April 2012)

In Conferences on August 29, 2011 at 4:16 pm

The Victorian Studies Association of Western Canada invites proposals for a conference on Victorian Media. The conference, hosted by the University of Victoria, will be held from 26-28 April 2012 in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.

We seek proposals for papers that focus on the theme of media in relation to Victorian culture and knowledge: that is, the relation of Victorian media to the culture of the period and the relation of new media to the study, dissemination, and archiving of Victorian materials.  In particular, we invite proposals on topics related to three main threads:

*   Victorians, print media, and cultural production (the book, the newspaper, the broadside, the illustrated press, the serial novel, the gift book, etc);
*   Victorians and visual/auditory/information media (the diorama, the phonograph, the photograph, the cinema, the panorama); and
*   Victorian Studies and new media (Victorian studies in a digital age, the digitization of Victorian resources, indexing of Victorian materials, the digital journal and the new scholar, teaching in a digital age, the scholar in the age of social media, etc).

The conference’s keynote speaker will be Matthew Rubery (Department of English at Queen Mary, University of London). Dr. Rubery is the author of The Novelty of Newspapers: Victorian Fiction after the Invention of the News (2009), which won the European Society for the Study of English First Book Award in 2010. He is currently at work on a monograph entitled The Untold Story of the Talking Book, a history of recorded literature since the invention of the phonograph in 1877.

The conference will also feature a workshop on Victorian print materials led by Brian Maidment (University of Salford), author of Comedy, Caricature and the Social Order 1820-1850, and Reading Popular Prints 1790-1870. This workshop will provide a hands-on opportunity to analyze original Victorian materials guided by an expert on print media and production methods.

Please submit proposals of not more than 500 words plus a 75-word biography and 100-word abstract to lsurridg@uvic.ca by 1 October 2011.

CFP: “Reassessing the Dramatic Monologue in the 19th and 20th Centuries” (London, June 2012)

In Conferences on August 29, 2011 at 4:13 pm

 

CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENT AND CALL FOR PAPERS

Reassessing the Dramatic Monologue in the 19th and 20th centuries:
Browning, Before, Beyond.
Royal Holloway, University of London 28-30 June 2012

Organised by the London Browning Society in collaboration with Royal Holloway, University of London, the University of Westminster and the University of the West of England. Supported by the British Association of Victorian Studies (BAVS).

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:

Isobel Armstrong
Daniel Karlin
Tricia Lootens
Cornelia Pearsell

Over the past two centuries, Robert Browning has been hailed initially as the co-inventor of the dramatic monologue, and more recently, as earlier origins of the genre have been proposed, as its most prominent practitioner. To celebrate the Bicentenary of Browning’s birth, the London Browning Society is hosting an international conference to reassess not only Browning’s work in what is arguably the defining genre of his oeuvre, but also the broader practice and theory of the dramatic monologue before, after and during his lifetime.

The conference remit of Browning, Before and Beyond proposes, in the first instance, to discuss the dramatic monologue in relation to Browning and other Victorian practitioners of the genre. The conference seeks to explore the reasons behind the rise of the genre during the Victorian era and the extent to which its formal and generic concerns with issues of performativity and spectacle, identity and subjectivity, text and ‘truth’ are illustrative of key concerns of the Victorian age.

Further, the conference hopes to extend critical discussion of the growth, profile, and generic nature of the dramatic monologue. The organisers welcome papers on pre-and post-Victorian poets and poems as a means of exploring the historical limits and reaches of the genre. Similarly, papers that explore the generic and disciplinary reaches of the form – its associations with drama, or connections to the Romantic lyric mode, for example – are warmly encouraged.

20-minute papers are invited on any topic relating to the dramatic monologue. Submissions may include, but are not restricted to:

•         new approaches to defining the dramatic monologue and its significance

•         reassessments of established approaches to the genre

•         the origins/ predecessors of the genre

•         Victorian variants of the genre

•         issues of subjectivity and selfhood

•         Post-Romanticism and the dramatic monologue

•         the dramatic monologue and gender

•         the genre’s relation to history

•         hybrid versions of the genre

•         twentieth-century and twenty-first century uses of the genre

•         the dramatic monologue and performance poetry

Conference organizers: Dr Simon Avery, Dr Vicky Greenaway, Dr Britta Martens. Please submit 300-word abstracts to s.avery@westminster.ac.uk by 31 January 2012.

New Issue of Victorian Literature and Culture (September 2011) Available

In Articles on August 24, 2011 at 11:46 am

VICTORIAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE 39:2

 

Research Articles


AFRICAN SKIN, VICTORIAN MASKS: THE OBJECT LESSONS OF MARY KINGSLEY AND EDWARD BLYDEN

Deborah Shapple Spillman
Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 02, September 2011, pp 305 – 326
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000015 (About doi) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]


THE ROMOLA CODE: “MEN OF APPETITES” IN GEORGE ELIOT’S HISTORICAL NOVEL

Nancy Henry
Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 02, September 2011, pp 327 – 348
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000027 (About doi) Published Online on 18th May 2011
<a title="THE ROMOLA CODE: “MEN OF APPETITES” IN GEORGE ELIOT’S HISTORICAL NOVEL” href=”http://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S1060150311000027&#8243; target=”_blank”>[ abstract ]


PAVEMENT, GUTTER, CARRIAGEWAY: SOCIAL ORDER AND URBAN SPACES IN THE WORK OF W. P. FRITH

Simon Knowles
Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 02, September 2011, pp 349 – 365
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000039 (About doi) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]


“THE CIRCLES OF VITALITY”: RUSKIN, SCIENCE, AND DYNAMIC MATERIALITY

Mark Frost
Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 02, September 2011, pp 367 – 383
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000040 (About doi) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]


SCRUTINIZING THE BATTLE OF DORKING: THE ROYAL UNITED SERVICE INSTITUTION AND THE MID-VICTORIAN INVASION CONTROVERSY

A. Michael Matin
Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 02, September 2011, pp 385 – 407
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000052 (About doi) Published Online on 18th May 2011
<a title="SCRUTINIZING THE BATTLE OF DORKING: THE ROYAL UNITED SERVICE INSTITUTION AND THE MID-VICTORIAN INVASION CONTROVERSY” href=”http://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S1060150311000052&#8243; target=”_blank”>[ abstract ]


LIVING BY DESIGN: C. R. ASHBEE’S GUILD OF HANDICRAFT AND TWO ENGLISH TOLSTOYAN COMMUNITIES, 1897–1907

Diana Maltz
Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 02, September 2011, pp 409 – 426
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000064 (About doi) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]


THOMAS HOOD, EARLY VICTORIAN CHRISTIAN SOCIAL CRITICISM, AND THE HOODIAN HERO

Robert D. Butterworth
Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 02, September 2011, pp 427 – 441
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000076 (About doi) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]


DOMESTIC SERVANTS, MIDNIGHT MEETINGS, AND THE MAGDALEN’S FRIEND AND FEMALE HOMES’ INTELLIGENCER

Scott Rogers
Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 02, September 2011, pp 443 – 461
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000088 (About doi) Published Online on 18th May 2011
<a title="DOMESTIC SERVANTS, MIDNIGHT MEETINGS, AND THE MAGDALEN’S FRIEND AND FEMALE HOMES’ INTELLIGENCER” href=”http://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S1060150311000088&#8243; target=”_blank”>[ abstract ]


“TO BE INDIFFERENT AND TO BE YOUNG”: DISRAELI, SYBIL, AND THE PRESERVATION OF AN AMERICAN “RACE,” 1879–1912

Gordon Fraser
Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 02, September 2011, pp 463 – 482
doi: 10.1017/S106015031100009X (About doi) Published Online on 18th May 2011
<a title="“TO BE INDIFFERENT AND TO BE YOUNG”: DISRAELI, SYBIL, AND THE PRESERVATION OF AN AMERICAN “RACE,” 1879–1912″ href=”http://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S106015031100009X&#8221; target=”_blank”>[ abstract ]


WAKING DREAMS: GEORGE ELIOT AND THE POETICS OF DOUBLE CONSCIOUSNESS

Beth Tressler
Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 02, September 2011, pp 483 – 498
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000106 (About doi) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]


MEREDITHIAN SLIPS: EMBODIED DISPOSITIONS AND NARRATIVE FORM IN THE EGOIST

Sean O’Toole
Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 02, September 2011, pp 499 – 524
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000118 (About doi) Published Online on 18th May 2011
<a title="MEREDITHIAN SLIPS: EMBODIED DISPOSITIONS AND NARRATIVE FORM IN THE EGOIST” href=”http://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S1060150311000118&#8243; target=”_blank”>[ abstract ]


“STAMPED ON HOT WAX”: GEORGE MEREDITH’S NARRATIVES OF INHERITANCE

Melissa Shields Jenkins
Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 02, September 2011, pp 525 – 543
doi: 10.1017/S106015031100012X (About doi) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]


LESSONS FROM THE GUTTER: SEX AND CONTAMINATION IN THE WAY WE LIVE NOW

Elizabeth Bleicher
Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 02, September 2011, pp 545 – 562
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000131 (About doi) Published Online on 18th May 2011
<a title="LESSONS FROM THE GUTTER: SEX AND CONTAMINATION IN THE WAY WE LIVE NOW” href=”http://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S1060150311000131&#8243; target=”_blank”>[ abstract ]


THE SYMPATHETIC INDIVIDUALIST: OUIDA’S LATE WORK AND POLITICS

Andrew King
Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 02, September 2011, pp 563 – 579
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000143 (About doi) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]


“THE PROMISE OF LITERATURE IN THE COMING DAYS”: THE BEST HUNDRED IRISH BOOKS CONTROVERSY OF 1886

Clare Hutton
Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 02, September 2011, pp 581 – 592
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000155 (About doi) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]

Review Essay


CURRENT THINKING: ON TRANSATLANTIC VICTORIANISM

John M. Picker
Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 02, September 2011, pp 595 – 603
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000179 (About doi) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]


REVOLUTIONIZING ELIZABETH BARRETT BROWNING: A REVIEW OF THE COMPLETE WORKS OF ELIZABETH BARRETT BROWNING

Alison Chapman
Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 39, Issue 02, September 2011, pp 605 – 611
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000180 (About doi) Published Online on 18th May 2011
<a title="REVOLUTIONIZING ELIZABETH BARRETT BROWNING: A REVIEW OF THE COMPLETE WORKS OF ELIZABETH BARRETT BROWNING” href=”http://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S1060150311000180&#8243; target=”_blank”>[ abstract ]

BAVS 2011 Conference schedule and registration (9/1-3/2011)

In Conferences, Uncategorized on August 8, 2011 at 1:04 pm

BAVS 2011 Conference schedule and registration (9/1-3/2011)

The program and schedule for the BAVS 2011 Conference, hosted by the University of Birmingham, are now available for viewing and downloading from our Google Docs site.

We are very excited about this wide an interdisciplinary programme, in which we are hosting around 120 papers over three days at the University of Birmingham Business School, on our Edgbaston campus. We have also schedule special sessions at the Barber Institute of Fine Arts:http://www.barber.org.uk/ and the Cadbury Research Library, home of our Special Collections: http://www.special-coll.bham.ac.uk/index.shtml

Keynote speakers are:

Overall Schedule: https://spreadsheets.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AkfTzomljON2dDV6ajNmMFIyMmdiSjFMd0czaEZCSkE&hl=en_US

Panel schedule:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1nB6XgldKTLTCvLSwfSzbJEbMh5mSc_RLSP2Q0wG85og/edit?hl=en_US

You can register for the Conference via our online shop at:http://bit.ly/oxnKHv

CFP: “Picturing the Nineteenth Century,” INCS 2012 (Kentucky, 3/22-25/2012)

In Conferences on August 8, 2011 at 1:03 pm

INCS 2012: Picturing the Nineteenth Century

March 22-25, 2012, University of Kentucky

Update: The website for the INCS 2012 Conference, “Picturing the Nineteenth Century,” is  now available at http://incs.as.uky.edu/.

CFP: Though its title foregrounds art and visual culture, this conference will treat “picturing” in all its many senses: imagining, representing, framing, mapping. We invite papers and panels that consider how the nineteenth century represented itself to itself – through depictions of subjectivity, history, and culture; through emerging technologies and disciplines; through self-conscious “meta” attempts to understand methods of representation. We also encourage papers that consider how our own technologies and disciplines create multiple pictures of “the nineteenth century.” Interdisciplinary papers and panels are especially welcome.

Featured speakers include Nancy Armstrong (English Department, Duke University), Julie Codell (Art History Department, Arizona State University), and Shawn Michelle Smith (Visual & Critical Studies, Art Institute of Chicago).

Themes include but are not limited to

  • “The visual turn” and its technologies
  • Display, exhibition, and spectatorship
  • Cartographies, real and imagined
  • Modes of representation: narrative, image, statistics, chronology
  • Urban geographies and ethnographies; mapping and tracking people
  • Imperialism as visual practice; global mappings and re-mappings
  • Representations of selves and bodies; life writing
  • Canons, institutions, and practices of art and literature
  • The materiality of the literary: illustrations, cover designs, advertising, publication
  • Archives, libraries, and their histories
  • Digitizing the nineteenth century
  • Teaching the nineteenth century

Deadline: October 17, 2011. For individual papers, send a 250-word proposals; for panels, send individual 250-word proposals for each paper plus a 250-word panel description. Please include your name, affiliation, and e-mail address on the proposals. Accepted papers will be due in early 2012.

Contact incs2012@uky.edu for more information.

CFP: Rural Geographies of Gender and Space, Britain 1840-1920 (Warwick, Sept. 23, 2011)

In Conferences on August 8, 2011 at 1:02 pm

Rural Geographies of Gender and Space, Britain 1840-1920 

23rd September 2011, University of Warwick

Whilst discussions of gender and space in the nineteenth-to early-twentieth century have typically focused on “women and the city”, rural spaces offer equally productive contexts for exploring the intersections between gender and space in this period. As the socio-spatial relations of the country are impacted by the move into modernity, rural environments are revealed in literary and historical texts as sites of complex, contradictory and changing gendered codes.

This half-day symposium offers a long-overdue forum in which to resituate the rural as a vital context for understanding the meanings of gender and space in this period. By bringing together scholars from different disciplinary perspectives we aim to understand the diverse experiences of gendered rural spaces and contribute to discussions about theoretical approaches to the (rural)space-gender intersection.

Proposals are invited for short papers from scholars in literary studies, history, geography, and any other discipline; postgraduate and early career researchers are especially encouraged to apply. Themes for discussion could include:

  • theories of gender and rural place: what do we mean by rural space, how do we theorise “the rural” as a spatial context, and how does gender intersect?
  • the impact of modernity;
  • mobility: walking, vagabonds, pedestrians, wayward women;
  • labour, class and gender in the country;
  • masculinities;
  • different ruralities;
  • visibility/ invisibility

Please send a 300-word proposal for 15 minute papers to the conference organisers by 15th August
Gemma.Goodman@warwick.ac.uk c.e.mathieson@warwick.ac.uk

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