On 19th-Century Literary Scholarship

Archive for May, 2011|Monthly archive page

Victorian Literature and Culture: Forthcoming Articles

In Articles on May 19, 2011 at 2:17 am

VICTORIAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE

Research Articles

(FirstView; not yet assigned to an issue)


AFRICAN SKIN, VICTORIAN MASKS: THE OBJECT LESSONS OF MARY KINGSLEY AND EDWARD BLYDEN

Deborah Shapple Spillman
FirstView
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000015 ( About doi ) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]


THE ROMOLA CODE: “MEN OF APPETITES” IN GEORGE ELIOT’S HISTORICAL NOVEL

Nancy Henry
FirstView
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000027 ( About doi ) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]


PAVEMENT, GUTTER, CARRIAGEWAY: SOCIAL ORDER AND URBAN SPACES IN THE WORK OF W. P. FRITH

Simon Knowles
FirstView
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000039 ( About doi ) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]


“THE CIRCLES OF VITALITY”: RUSKIN, SCIENCE, AND DYNAMIC MATERIALITY

Mark Frost
FirstView
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000040 ( About doi ) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]


SCRUTINIZING THE BATTLE OF DORKING: THE ROYAL UNITED SERVICE INSTITUTION AND THE MID-VICTORIAN INVASION CONTROVERSY

A. Michael Matin
FirstView
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000052 ( About doi ) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]


LIVING BY DESIGN: C. R. ASHBEE’S GUILD OF HANDICRAFT AND TWO ENGLISH TOLSTOYAN COMMUNITIES, 1897–1907

Diana Maltz
FirstView
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000064 ( About doi ) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]


THOMAS HOOD, EARLY VICTORIAN CHRISTIAN SOCIAL CRITICISM, AND THE HOODIAN HERO

Robert D. Butterworth
FirstView
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000076 ( About doi ) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]


DOMESTIC SERVANTS, MIDNIGHT MEETINGS, AND THE MAGDALEN’S FRIEND AND FEMALE HOMES’ INTELLIGENCER

Scott Rogers
FirstView
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000088 ( About doi ) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]


“TO BE INDIFFERENT AND TO BE YOUNG”: DISRAELI, SYBIL, AND THE PRESERVATION OF AN AMERICAN “RACE,” 1879–1912

Gordon Fraser
FirstView
doi: 10.1017/S106015031100009X ( About doi ) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]


WAKING DREAMS: GEORGE ELIOT AND THE POETICS OF DOUBLE CONSCIOUSNESS

Beth Tressler
FirstView
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000106 ( About doi ) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]


MEREDITHIAN SLIPS: EMBODIED DISPOSITIONS AND NARRATIVE FORM IN THE EGOIST

Sean O’Toole
FirstView
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000118 ( About doi ) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]


“STAMPED ON HOT WAX”: GEORGE MEREDITH’S NARRATIVES OF INHERITANCE

Melissa Shields Jenkins
FirstView
doi: 10.1017/S106015031100012X ( About doi ) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]


LESSONS FROM THE GUTTER: SEX AND CONTAMINATION IN THE WAY WE LIVE NOW

Elizabeth Bleicher
FirstView
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000131 ( About doi ) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]


THE SYMPATHETIC INDIVIDUALIST: OUIDA’S LATE WORK AND POLITICS

Andrew King
FirstView
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000143 ( About doi ) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]


“THE PROMISE OF LITERATURE IN THE COMING DAYS”: THE BEST HUNDRED IRISH BOOKS CONTROVERSY OF 1886

Clare Hutton
FirstView
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000155 ( About doi ) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]

Review Essay


CURRENT THINKING: ON TRANSATLANTIC VICTORIANISM

John M. Picker
FirstView
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000179 ( About doi ) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]


REVOLUTIONIZING ELIZABETH BARRETT BROWNING: A REVIEW OF THE COMPLETE WORKS OF ELIZABETH BARRETT BROWNING

Alison Chapman
FirstView
doi: 10.1017/S1060150311000180 ( About doi ) Published Online on 18th May 2011
[ abstract ]

Women’s Studies 40:4: “19th-Century Women Writers and the Classical Inheritance,” Now Available

In Articles on May 12, 2011 at 9:33 am

Women’s Studies 40.4, 2011

Special Issue: Nineteenth-Century Women Writers and the Classical Inheritance
Guest Editor: Noah Comet

ARTICLES

Introduction
NOAH COMET

“Copying Shelley’s Letters”: Mary Shelley and the Uncanny Erotics of Greek
JENNIFER WALLACE

“Thou thing of years departed”: (En)gendering Posthumous Sublimity incFelicia Hemans’s “The Image in Lava
MEILEE D. BRIDGES

Classical Daughters: Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Margaret Fuller
ISOBEL HURST

Augusta Webster and the Social History of Myth
SHANYN FISKE

Bacchic Transference and Ecstatic Faith: Michael Field’s Callirrhoë and the Origins of Drama
ANDREW EASTHAM

Lessons in Greek Art: Jane Harrison and Aestheticism
STEFANO EVANGELISTA

BOOK REVIEWS

STUART CURRAN: Charles E. Robinson, Ed. The Original Frankenstein

KATHERINE SINGER: Devoney Looser. Women Writers and Old Age in Great Britain, 1750-1850

LISA KASMER: Lynette Felber, Ed. Clio’s Daughters: British Women Making History, 1790-1899

AMY MUSE: Vassiliki Kolocotroni and Efterpi Mitsi, Eds. Women Writing Greece: Essays on Hellenism, Orientalism and Travel

FUSON WANG: Adriana Craciun. British Women Writers and the French Revolution: Citizens of the World

LAUREN CAMERON: Tamara S. Wagner, Ed. Antifeminism and the Victorian Novel: Rereading Nineteenth-Century Women Writers

CFP : “The Dark Side of the Mediterranean World” (Nice, France, 27-28 April 2012)

In Conferences on May 12, 2011 at 9:24 am

Call for Papers
Southern Horrors : The Dark Side of the Mediterranean World Seen from Northern Europe and America (1453-1939)
University of Nice (France)
27-28 April 2012

“The Mediterranean is the human norm. When men leave that exquisite lake /./ they approach the monstrous and the extraordinary.” This view, expressed by a character in A Passage to India, is a perfect example, in its extreme form, of that “passion for the Mediterranean” that John Pemble discusses in one of his books.  However, the fascination that Northern Europeans (and, a little later Americans also) felt very early for this “exquisite lake” was rarely so strong that, coming from a very different political, social and cultural context, they did not also discover features of the “monstrous” and “extraordinary” on the shores of the Mediterranean. While Northern perceptions of the beauty, vitality, spirituality and sensuality of Mediterranean societies have been the subject of numerous scholarly studies, less attention has been paid to what “stern people that winter suited”,  to cite Charles Kingsley, inevitably found troubling about them. It is this reverse side of the coin, where cruelty, decreptitude, ignorance and oppression dominate, that this conference sets out to explore, less with a view to revealing the “truth” about the “Southern horrors” of the Mediterranean that the arts, literatures and other forms of writing (travel narratives and memoirs, diaries, journalism, political speeches, diplomatic dispatches…) of the North reported, described (and sometimes imagined) than to attempt to establish the historical conditions – cultural, social, aesthetic and personal – that determined their perception (or their invention) and inspired their representation. From there, an effort will be made to sketch out some conclusions concerning what the repulsion, indignation, phobias found in these representations tell us about the customs, values and certainties of the civilisations of Northern Europe and America at different phases of their history – from the fall of Constantinople to the end of the Spanish Civil War.

By Mediterranean World is understood the geographical area extending from the Strait of Gibraltar to the Bosphorus and the Levant (to these can be added on the one hand the western regions of the Black Sea, notably Bulgaria, and on the other Portugal). Fernand Braudel’s criteria will be adopted for the northern and southern limits of this world: from Donzère to Timgad, from the first olive trees encountered when coming from the North to the clusters of palm trees growing on the edge of the desert.

The following themes are not exclusive. They provide some indications as to the desired overall orientation of the conference.

.       Violence in the Mediterranean world: wars, massacres, assassinations, persecutions, forced migrations.
.       Natural disasters: volcanic eruptions, earthquakes.
.       Diseases and epidemics: the plague, malaria.
.       The horrors of religion: catholicism and superstition.
.       From classical grandeur to the horrors of the present: meditations on decadence
.       Geographies of horror: towns and villages of the South, “so much ruin and neglect” (Dickens).
.       The exoticism of horror and the horror of exoticism: leprous inns, filth and bedbugs, brigands and beggars.
.       When horror comes from the North: adulteration and disfigurement by tourism.
.       When horror rises towards the North: the papist menace, migrations and mafias.
.       When the horrors of the South seize the imagination: Jacobean drama, the Gothic novel..

Proposals in the form of an abstract in English or French of c.250 words should be submitted by November 20th 2011.
Contact Martine Monacelli at mmonacelli.faraut@aliceadsl.fr or Gilbert Bonifas at gilbert.bonifas@wanadoo.fr.

CFP: “Global Dickens” (AVSA), Brisbane, April 2012

In Conferences on May 11, 2011 at 11:44 am

CFP: “Global Dickens”

Griffith University, Brisbane

April 15 2012

Keynote Speaker: Regenia Gagnier (Exeter)

In conjunction with the Australasian Victorian Studies Association conference (“Victorian Vocabularies “April 11th-14th 2012), “Global Dickens” is a day-long conference that will explore how Dickens has been received, adapted, imitated, or syncretised outside Britain. What forms of intersexuality have been generated with indigenous cultural forms? What is the role of Dickens’s Britain in the imaginary of other cultures?

We welcome proposals for 20 minute papers that consider any aspect of this theme. Please submit a 150-250 word abstract no later than September 30th 2011 to d.ellison@griffith.edu.au

Any queries regarding the conference can be directed to the same address.

Postgraduate Travel Scholarships available

CFP: “Victorian Vocabularies,” AVSA, Brisbane, April 2012

In Conferences on May 11, 2011 at 11:42 am

Call For Papers:

“Victorian Vocabularies”

Australasian Victorian Studies Association Conference

Griffith University, Brisbane

11th-14th April 2012

Keynote speakers include: Helen Groth (University of New South Wales), Andrew H. Miller (Indiana) and Cathy Waters (Kent)

Victorians needed names for new things, novel practices, and emergent techniques. Cumulatively, these formed vocabularies, some by deliberation and design, others aggregating over time. The era abounds in private and specialised languages, modish slangs, and technical terms used in craft, industry, medicine, law, the arts, and sciences. These vocabularies circulated through small networks or made the leap to the public realm where they could be considered in new lights and put to unfamiliar uses. We invite you to think about Victorian vocabularies across British, colonial, and global contexts. Papers might address vocabulary-making, transmission, and re-purposing. They might consider the vocabulary as pedagogic tool or as potent metaphor. Possible topics include:

-Specialist and technical vocabularies

-Narratives of vocabulary-making

-Educational vocabularies

-Political vocabularies

-Vocabularies of the body

-Emotional vocabularies

-Commercial and legal vocabularies

-Vocabularies and globalisation

-Representations of vocabularies

-Colonial and military vocabularies

-Vocabularies and mass culture

-Visual culture and vocabularies

-Animal vocabularies

-Sexual vocabularies

-Neo-Victorian vocabularies

-Religious vocabularies

Please send paper proposals (of approx 150-250 words) for 20 minute papers to d.ellison@griffith.edu.au no later than September 30th 2011

Any queries regarding the conference can be directed to the same address.

Postgraduate Travel Scholarships available

http://www.avsa.unimelb.edu.au/AVSA%20News.htm

New Romantic Praxis volume, “Romantic Fandom,” Now Available

In Articles on May 9, 2011 at 11:51 am

Romantic Fandom
A Romantic Circles Praxis Volume
Edited by Eric Eisner

http://www.rc.umd.edu/praxis/fandom/index.html

Table of Contents

* "Introduction"
* Eric Eisner, George Mason University

* "Fandom mapped: Rousseau, Scott and Byron on the Itinerary of Lady Frances Shelley"
* Nicola J. Watson, Open University

* "On His Knees: Stendhal, Byron and a Hundred Irresistible Impulses"
* Clara Tuite, University of Melbourne

* "Byron in the Satirist: Aristocratic Lounging and Literary Labor"
* Mark Schoenfield, Vanderbilt University

* "The Moment of Tom and Jerry ('when fistycuffs were the fashion')"
* David A. Brewer, The Ohio State University

With essays by Nicola J. Watson, Clara Tuite, Mark Schoenfield, and David A. Brewer, this volume deepens our understanding of Romanticism’s publics as socially heterogeneous, inventive, and unpredictable, shaped by and shaping rapidly changing institutions of performance, publication, reading, spectatorship, leisure and consumption. By mapping the complicated social dynamics informing the activity of particular fans, Romantic Fandom demonstrates both the diversity of Romantic fan practices and the historical particularity of the forms Romantic fandom takes. While these essays contest literary criticism’s often habitual abjection of the fan, they also resist conflating Romantic fandom with our own.

You can find Romantic Fandom here: http://romantic.arhu.umd.edu/praxis/fandom

CFP: “Strange New Today” Victorian Conference, Exeter, September 2011

In Conferences on May 5, 2011 at 1:25 pm

STRANGE NEW TODAY:

Conference for postgraduate and early-career Victorianists

September 2011

“This English Nation, will it ever get to know the meaning of its strange new Today?” (Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present)

Chartists storm the Westgate Hotel in Newport, South Wales, 1839.

The postgraduate students in the University of Exeter’s Centre for Victorian Studies will be holding a conference for postgrads and early-career researchers in September 2011.  The conference will take place in the historic setting of the Devon and Exeter Institution, which was founded in 1813 as a private library.

Keynote speakers:

Professor Regenia Gagnier (University of Exeter)

Professor Philip Davis (University of Liverpool)

Plenary:

Prof. Davis will be joined by Jane Davis and Dr Josie Billington from The Reader Organisation for a discussion on crisis, Victorian literature and “the reading cure”.

Call for Papers:
In Past and Present, Thomas Carlyle conceives of modern crisis as a deadly riddle posed by the Sphinx – with a viable future or social collapse contingent upon the answer: “This English Nation, will it get to know the meaning of its strange new Today?”

This conference is intended to elicit papers that respond to the generative effects of the perception of crisis in the Victorian period.  Awareness of crisis stimulated intellectual enquiry in new disciplinary directions: in history and historiography, archaeology and classicism, evolutionary biology, economic and social theory, in literary expressions of cultural critique, and in personal and psychological narratives.  Such intellectual productivity – and the insistence upon circulating the new analyses of crisis within a public realm of discussion – constitutes a response that we might wish to draw upon in our own times of perceived crisis.

The commemorations of Darwin’s On the Origin of Species and the returns to Marx for explanations of the current economic crisis exemplify a revival of interest in how thought from the Victorian period lives on in the contemporary world.  This conference is an opportunity to investigate the productive and prolific nature of the Victorians’ response to the idea of cultural and personal crisis – as theorists or as writers whose literary works could help us grasp “the meaning of our strange new Today”.

Please send proposals (of approx. 250 words) for 15 – 20 minute papers to southwestvictorianists@exeter.ac.uk no later than Friday the 27th of May.  Any queries regarding the conference can be directed to the same address.

CFP: Special Issue of Victorian Network on Productivity and Consumption

In Articles on May 5, 2011 at 1:17 pm

CfP: Production and Consumption in Victorian Literature and Culture

The fifth issue of Victorian Network, guest edited by Dr Ella Dzelzainis (Newcastle University), is dedicated to a reassessment of nineteenth-century investments in concepts of productivity and consumption. Accelerating industrialisation, the growth of consumer culture, economic debates about the perils of overconsumption as well as emerging cultural discourses about industriousness, work ethic and the uses of free time radically altered the ways in which Victorians thought about practices of production and consumption. Literary authors intervened directly in these economic and social debates while also negotiating analogous developments within a literary marketplace transformed by new forms of writing, distributing and consuming literature. We are inviting submissions of no more than 7000 words. Possible topics include but are by no means limited to the following:

•   Productivist and consumerist ideologies and the politics of social class

•   Victorian (global) spaces of production, forms and practices of consumption

•   Changing concepts of literary production, authorship and the reading audience

•   Biological and physiological models of productivity, attrition and idleness

•   New agents in the literary marketplace: publishers, editors, book sellers

•   Economic theory and nineteenth-century literature

•   Reassessing Marxist perspectives on Victorian literature and culture

•   Idleness, spare time and other modes of ‘unproductiveness’

•  The effects of industrialisation: mechanization, work routine and ‘human motors’

All submissions should conform to MHRA style conventions and the in-house submission guidelines. The deadline for submissions to our next issue is 1 July, 2011. Contact: victoriannetwork@gmail.com

http://www.victoriannetwork.org/index.php/vn

CFP: Dickens Society Symposium, Lowell, MA, July 2012

In Conferences on May 5, 2011 at 1:13 pm

DICKENS SOCIETY SYMPOSIUM
University of Massachusetts Lowell &
Lowell National Historical Park
Lowell, Massachusetts
13–15 July 2012

The Dickens Society will be offering an additional symposium and Dickens dinner during the bicentenary year.  These festivities will be held stateside at the Lowell National Historical Park on 13–15 July 2012. Hotel accommodation in downtown Lowell at the UMass Lowell Inn and Conference Center will provide easy access to a major exhibition at the National Park — Dickens and Massachusetts: Untold Stories.  The exhibition will include several rare artifacts, including the 1842 portrait of Dickens by Boston painter Francis Alexander and the Boston Line Type edition of The Old Curiosity Shop donated by Dickens to the Perkins School for the Blind in 1868. Interactive elements such as electronically sensored skull models will enable visitors to try a phrenological “reading” of Dickens.  The popular Dickens walking tour of Lowell (first offered at the Dickens and America conference in 2002) and interactive sessions at the Tsongas Industrial History Center will also be featured offerings of the symposium.

Paper proposals on any aspect of Dickens and his works are invited. Final papers must be readable in twenty minutes. Please send one-page proposals electronically, by attachment, to Joel J. Brattin at jjb@wpi.edu no later than 31 March 2012. Further symposium information and updates will be available on the Dickens Quarterly website (http://www.DickensQuarterly.org) and from symposium co-chairs Diana Archibald (diana_archibald@uml.edu, English Department UMass Lowell, 61 Wilder St., Lowell, MA 01854) or Joel J. Brattin (Humanities & Arts Department, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA 01609-2280). Scholars at all stages of their careers are encouraged to submit proposals, and graduate students may register for the symposium at a reduced rate.

Located in the historic industrial city of Lowell, 25 miles northwest of Boston, the University of Massachusetts Lowell campus spans more than 125 acres along the Merrimack River. UMass Lowell is easily reached by either Manchester (New Hampshire) Airport or Boston’s Logan Airport. Lowell is connected to Boston via Amtrak trains (through north station in Boston) as well as bus service. Lowell is a great location from which to launch a side trip to the city of Boston, the beaches of Cape Cod, the resorts of Newport (Rhode Island), and even bustling New York City.

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