On 19th-Century Literary Scholarship

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Nineteenth-Century Studies Association: 2011 Emerging Scholars Award

In Awards on October 27, 2010 at 11:13 am

NCSA Emerging Scholars Award

The Nineteenth Century Studies Association (NCSA) is pleased to announce the 2011 Emerging Scholars Award. The work of emerging scholars represents the promise and long-term future of interdisciplinary scholarship in 19th-century studies. In recognition of the excellent publications of this constituency of emerging scholars, this award recognizes an outstanding article or essay published within five years of the author’s doctorate. Entries can be from any discipline focusing on any aspect of the long 19th century (the French Revolution to World War I), must be published in English or be accompanied by an English translation, and must be by a single author. Submission of essays that are interdisciplinary is especially encouraged. Entrants must be within five years of having received a doctorate or other terminal professional degree, and must have less than seven years of experience either in an academic career, or as a post-terminal-degree independent scholar or practicing professional.

Only articles physically published between September 1, 2009 and August 31, 2010 (even if the citation date of the journal is different) are eligible for the 2011 Emerging Scholars Award. Articles published in any scholarly journal, including on-line journals, or in edited volumes of essays are eligible and may be submitted either by the author or the publisher of a journal, anthology, or volume containing independent essays. In any given year, an applicant may submit more than one article for this award. The winning article will be selected by a committee of nineteenth-century scholars representing diverse disciplines. Articles submitted to the NCSA Article Prize competition are ineligible for the Emerging Scholars Award. The winner will receive $500 to be presented at the 32nd annual NCSA Conference, “Money/Myths,” in Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 3-6, 2011. Prize recipients need not be members of the NCSA but are encouraged to attend the conference to receive the award. D*eadline for submission is November 19, 2010.*

Send three off-prints or photocopies of published articles/essays to the committee chair: Phylis Floyd, Associate Professor of Art History, Michigan State University, 25 Kresge Art Center, East Lansing, MI 48824-1119. (Electronic submissions will not be accepted.) Address all questions to floyd@msu.edu. Please note that applicants must verify date of actual publication for eligibility and provide an email address so that receipt of their submissions may be acknowledged.

Fall 2010 Issue of Victorian Periodicals Review

In Articles on October 27, 2010 at 11:00 am

Victorian Periodicals Review

Volume 43, Number 3, Fall 2010

Table of Contents


RSVP Bibliography: 2007-2009
pp. 217-261

Articles

“Mrs. Schlesinger Wields a Facile Pen”: Articulations of Spiritualist Feminism in Julia Schlesinger’s Carrier Dove
pp. 262-295
The Month As Hopkins Knew It
pp. 296-308
Athletic Fashion, Punch, and the Creation of the New Woman
pp. 309-335

Book Reviews

Come Buy, Come Buy: Shopping and the Culture of Consumption in Victorian Women’s Writing (review)
pp. 336-337
The Dynamics of Genre: Journalism and the Practice of Literature in Mid-Victorian Britain (review)
pp. 337-339
Dickens and the Popular Radical Imagination (review)
pp. 339-341
Punch and Shakespeare in the Victorian Era (review)
pp. 342-343
The Victorian Press and the Fairy Tale (review)
pp. 343-345

CFP: BARS Early Career Conference: “Romantic Identities,” London, May 2011

In Conferences on October 26, 2010 at 9:10 am

British Association for Romantic Studies

Early Career and Postgraduate Conference 2011

 

Romantic Identities

Selves in Society, 1770-1835

 

Institute of English Studies, Senate House, London

 

Friday 13th May 2011

 

When I charged you with depraved morality, obscenity, and indecency, I spoke not of Leigh Hunt as a man.  I deny the fact, – I have no reason to doubt that your private character is respectable; but I judged you from your works

– ‘Letter from Z. to Mr Leigh Hunt’, Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, Jan 1818

 

The British Association for Romantic Studies invites proposals for papers for its 2011 Early Career and Postgraduate conference on the theme of Romantic Identities.  Political and military conflict, the proliferation of print culture, and the diverse aesthetics espoused by competing authors all served to make the Romantic period one in which creating, assuming and redefining different kinds of identities was of critical importance.  Increased interest in the lives and characters of writers, particularly in periodicals, constrained certain authors while provoking others to develop new forms of self-expression.  Effectively manipulating identities was also critical to the period’s burgeoning theatrical culture, in debates about hierarchies of forms and genres, and in the works and reception of female and working-class writers.  The interplay of these competing self-presentations has had wide-ranging and continuing consequences, including the posthumous canonisation of certain writers of the period as Romantics while others remain neglected.

 

We welcome proposals for papers on any aspects of the ways that writers and works of the period construct, construe and project identities and/or on the ways such identities have been received.  Topics might include, but are not limited to: theatre and theatricality; nationalism; imperialism; femininities and masculinities; gender and sexuality; class; authorial masks and personae; censorship; criticism and politics; fame and celebrity; conceptions of Romanticism; ideas of literary value; identities in visual arts; characters and lives; auto/biography; genres; archetypes; iconography and worship; modes of education; publicity and promotion; periodical culture; anonymous and pseudonymous authorship; forgery and authenticity; genius and hack writing.

 

In addition to panel sessions, the conference will feature a keynote address by John Whale (University of Leeds) and a roundtable session on conceiving, co-ordinating and working on large-scale academic projects with Sharon Ruston (University of Salford) and Simon Eliot (Institute of English Studies).

 

Papers at the conference will last twenty minutes.  If you are interested in presenting a paper, please email an abstract of up to 250 words to romanticidentities@gmail.com.  Please also direct any queries or questions to this address.

 

Deadline for abstracts: 15th January 2011

 

Organisers: Matthew Sangster (Royal Holloway) & Daniel Cook (Bristol)


Dr. Daniel Cook, Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow
Assistant Director, Centre for Romantic Studies, University of Bristol
Office: Room 2.11, 3/5 Woodland Road, University of Bristol, BS8 1TB

Co-Editor of The Cambridge University Press Jonathan Swift Archive
Executive Committee, The British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies
Executive Committee, The British Association for Romantic Studies
Treasurer and Secretary, The Thomas Chatterton Society, Bristol

www.bsecs.org.uk
www.bars.ac.uk
www.bristol.ac.uk
www.jonathanswiftarchive.org.uk

CFP: Hardy at Yale II, June 2011

In Conferences on October 23, 2010 at 9:35 pm

The Thomas Hardy Association and the Yale Center for British Art are pleased to announce the following speakers for the Hardy at Yale II conference, June 9-12, 2011.

Plenary Speakers

Professor George Levine (Professor Emeritus, Rutgers University; Distinguished Scholar in Residence, New York University)
Professor Herbert Tucker (John C. Coleman Professor of Nineteenth-Century British Literature, University of Virginia)
Professor Penny Boumelha (Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic), Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand; Fellow of the Academy of the Humanities, Australia)
Professor Gillian Forrester (Yale Center for British Art, Yale University)

Guest Lecturers

Dr. Linda Shires (Yeshiva University); Dr. Pamela Dalziel (University of British Columbia); Dr. Jane Thomas (Hull University); Dr. Phillip Mallett (St. Andrews University); Dr. Angelique Richardson (Exeter University); Dr. Judith Mitchell (University of Victoria); Dr. Rosemarie Morgan (St. Andrews University); Dr. William Morgan (Illinois State University); Dr. Anna Henchman (Boston University)

Special Guest Performance by Douglas Yeo (Boston Symphony) and The Mellstock Band (Dorset, UK)

The deadline for submission of completed papers and paper proposals is December 15, 2010.  For conference details please see The Thomas Hardy Association website at http://arts.st-andrews.ac.uk/ttha.

CFP: NASSR 2011, “Romanticism and Independence,” Park City, August 2011

In Conferences on October 18, 2010 at 1:37 pm

NASSR 2011: “Romanticism and Independence”

August 11-14, 2011 in Park City, Utah

Deadline for proposals: January 15, 2011

Conference website: http://nassr11.byu.edu/

Conference Organizers: Andrew Franta (University of Utah) and Nicholas Mason (Brigham Young University)

Plan now to join us in the mountains of Utah for “Romanticism and Independence,” the 2011 conference of the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism.  The conference will be held 45 minutes east of Salt Lake City in Park City, the resort town that hosted the 2002 Winter Olympics and is permanent home to the Sundance Film Festival.

NASSR 2011 will include keynote addresses by Ian Duncan (UC-Berkeley) and Deidre Lynch (Toronto) and break-out seminars on classic books in the field and their contemporary counterparts.

The NASSR 2011 Organizing Committee invites proposals for papers and special sessions on “Romanticism and Independence.”  The conference theme is capacious, and we encourage submissions that engage any of its many possible inflections: literary, aesthetic, political, social, cultural, scientific. Proposals from disciplinary perspectives beyond literature and the arts are particularly welcome.

Please submit proposals of 500 words to
nassr.utah@hotmail.com by January 15, 2011.

In addition to paper proposals, we also invite the submission of proposals for complete special sessions on the conference theme.  Special sessions should consist of three presenters and a moderator (who may also be a presenter); please submit separate proposals for each paper and a brief description of the session.  In the event that a proposed special session cannot be accommodated, individual paper proposals will be considered separately.  We would also be happy to help make arrangements for those whowould prefer to organize special sessions through an open call for papers.

Topics for papers and special sessions might include:

Generic and Formal Innovations
Imagination
Sublimity
Impartiality and Disinterestedness
Individualism
Liberty
Sovereignty
Feminism
Religious Freedom
Libertinism
Declarations of Independence
Romantic Nationalism
Atlantic Revolutions
Transatlantic Independence Movements
Counter-Enlightenment
Philhellenism
Romanticism and the American West
“Indie Romanticism”
Romanticism and Film
Romanticism and Contemporary Culture

**Please note that the availability of audio-visual equipment will be limited and will be allocated by application after papers have been accepted.**

CFP: “Romantic Identities,” BARS Early Career Conference 2011, London

In Conferences on October 13, 2010 at 3:43 pm

British Association for Romantic Studies

Early Career and Postgraduate Conference 2011

 

Romantic Identities

Selves in Society, 1770-1835

Institute of English Studies, Senate House, London

 

Friday 13th May 2011

 

When I charged you with depraved morality, obscenity, and indecency, I spoke not of Leigh Hunt as a man.  I deny the fact, – I have no reason to doubt that your private character is respectable; but I judged you from your works

– ‘Letter from Z. to Mr Leigh Hunt’, Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, Jan 1818

 

The British Association for Romantic Studies invites proposals for papers for its 2011 Early Career and Postgraduate conference on the theme of Romantic Identities.  Political and military conflict, the proliferation of print culture, and the diverse aesthetics espoused by competing authors all served to make the Romantic period one in which creating, assuming and redefining different kinds of identities was of critical importance.  Increased interest in the lives and characters of writers, particularly in periodicals, constrained certain authors while provoking others to develop new forms of self-expression.  Effectively manipulating identities was also critical to the period’s burgeoning theatrical culture, in debates about hierarchies of forms and genres, and in the works and reception of female and working-class writers.  The interplay of these competing self-presentations has had wide-ranging and continuing consequences, including the posthumous canonisation of certain writers of the period as Romantics while others remain neglected.

 

We welcome proposals for papers on any aspects of the ways that writers and works of the period construct, construe and project identities and/or on the ways such identities have been received.  Topics might include, but are not limited to: theatre and theatricality; nationalism; imperialism; femininities and masculinities; gender and sexuality; class; authorial masks and personae; censorship; criticism and politics; fame and celebrity; conceptions of Romanticism; ideas of literary value; identities in visual arts; characters and lives; auto/biography; genres; archetypes; iconography and worship; modes of education; publicity and promotion; periodical culture; anonymous and pseudonymous authorship; forgery and authenticity; genius and hack writing.

 

In addition to panel sessions, the conference will feature a keynote address by John Whale (University of Leeds) and a roundtable session on conceiving, co-ordinating and working on large-scale academic projects with Sharon Ruston (University of Salford) and Simon Eliot (Institute of English Studies).

 

Papers at the conference will last twenty minutes.  If you are interested in presenting a paper, please email an abstract of up to 250 words to romanticidentities@gmail.com.  Please also direct any queries or questions to this address.

 

Deadline for abstracts: 15th January 2011

 

Organisers: Matthew Sangster (Royal Holloway) & Daniel Cook (Bristol)

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