On 19th-Century Literary Scholarship

Archive for September, 2010|Monthly archive page

New Issue: Romanticism and Victorianism on the Net: “Victorian Studies and its Publics”

In Articles on September 28, 2010 at 10:14 am

Romanticism and Victorianism on the Net #55 (August 2009):

“Victorian Studies and its Publics”

ed. Linda K. Hughes (Texas Christian University, Fort Worth):

Introduction

Articles:

Russell M. Wyland (National Endowment for the Humanities): ‘Public Funding and the “Untamed Wilderness” of Victorian Studies
Laurel Brake (Birkbeck, University of London): ‘Tacking: Nineteenth-Century Print Culture and its Readers
Anne Helmreich (Case Western Reserve University): ‘Victorian Exhibition Culture: The Market Then and the Museum Today
Margaret Stetz (University of Delaware): ‘“Would You Like Some Victorian Dressing with That?”
Miriam Bailin (Washington University): ‘A Community of Interest—Victorian Scholars and Literary Societies
Regenia Gagnier (University of Exeter): ‘Victorian Studies’ International Publics: The California Dickens and Global Circulation Projects
Teresa Mangum (University of Iowa): ‘The Many Lives of Victorian Fiction
Carol Christ (Smith College): ‘Victorian Studies and its Publics

Book Reviews:

Anthony Jarrells (University of South Carolina): ‘David Simpson. Wordsworth, Commodification and Social Concern: The Poetics of Modernity
Ian Dennis (University of Ottawa): ‘Cheryl A. Wilson, ed. Byron: Heritage and Legacy
Patrick Madden (Brigham Young University): ‘Denise Gigante. The Great Age of the English Essay
Ihsen Hachaichi (Université de Montréal): ‘Andrew Bennett. Wordsworth Writing
Noel Jackson (Massachusetts Institute of Technology): ‘Jeffrey C. Robinson. Unfettering Poetry: Fancy in British Romanticism
Jeffrey W. Barbeau (Wheaton College): ‘Nicholas Reid. Coleridge, Form and Symbol, or The Ascertaining Vision
Caroline Levine (University of Wisconsin-Madison): ‘Kate Flint. The Transatlantic Indian, 1776-1930
Julia F. Saville (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign): ‘Herbert F. Tucker. Epic: Britain’s Heroic Muse 1790-1910
Georgina O’Brien Hill (University of Chester): ‘Laurel Brake and Marysa Demoor, eds. DNCJ: Dictionary of Nineteenth-Century Journalism in Great Britain and Ireland
Elsie B. Michie (Louisiana State University): ‘Linda H. Peterson. Becoming a Woman of Letters: Myths of Authorship and Facts of the Victorian Market
Paul Sawyer (Cornell University): ‘Jason Camlot. Style and the Nineteenth-Century British Critic: Sincere Mannerisms
Gordon Bigelow (Rhodes College): ‘Margaret Marwick, Deborah Denenholz Morse, and Regenia Gagnier, eds. The Politics of Gender in Anthony Trollope’s Novels: New Readings for the Twenty-First Century
Roberto Dainotto (Duke University): ‘Chenxi Tang. The Geographic Imagination of Modernity: Geography, Literature, and Philosophy in German Romanticism
Constance Hassett (Fordham University): ‘Suzanne Waldman. The Demon and the Damozel: Dynamics of Desire in the Works of Christina Rossetti and Dante Gabriel Rossetti
Herbert Sussman (The New School): ‘Trev Lynn Broughton and Helen Rogers, eds. Gender and Fatherhood in the Nineteenth Century
Kathleen Callanan Martin (Boston University): ‘Ellen Bayuk Rosenman, and Claudia C. Klaver, eds. Other Mothers: Beyond the Maternal Ideal
Miriam Elizabeth Burstein (College at Brockport, State University of New York): ‘Maria LaMonaca. Masked Atheism: Catholicism and the Secular Victorian Home
Zia Miric (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign): ‘Nadia Valman. The Jewess in Nineteenth-Century British Literary Culture
Daniel Wong (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign): ‘Victoria Morgan and Clare Williams, eds. Shaping Belief: Culture, Politics and Religion in Nineteenth-Century Writing
Lorna Hardwick (The Open University, UK): ‘Shanyn Fiske. Heretical Hellenism: Women Writers, Ancient Greece and the Victorian Popular Imagination
Ruth Livesey (University of London): ‘Spellbound, George Gissing. Volume I: The Storyteller; Volume II: A Twenty-First Century Reappraisal
Andrea Goulet (University of Pennsylvania): ‘Chris Otter. The Victorian Eye: A Political History of Light and Vision in Britain, 1800-1910
Margaret Cohen (Stanford University): ‘Anne-Lise François. Open Secrets: The Literature of Uncounted Experience

CFP: “Romanticism and the Tyrannies of Distance,” Australia (RSAA), February 2011

In Conferences on September 28, 2010 at 10:00 am

Romanticism and the Tyrannies of Distance

10-12 February 2011

Call For Papers <http://www.conference.rsaa.net.au/>

Plenary speakers:
Deirdre Coleman (Melbourne)
Nicholas Roe (St Andrews)
James Chandler (Chicago)

Panel discussion:
Iain McCalman (Sydney)
Gillian Russell (ANU)
Clara Tuite (Melbourne)

This is the first of the biennial conferences planned for the newly founded Romantic Studies Association of Australasia (RSAA), to take place at the University of Sydney from Thursday to Saturday, 10-12 February 2011. The theme of the conference will be “Romanticism and the Tyrannies of Distance”, after the Australian historian Geoffrey Blainey’s now classic account of the way the geographical remoteness of Australia has shaped its history and identity. From here, it is a small step to seeing the way in which all kinds of distance – and the will to overcome distance – conditioned and challenged the writers and thinkers of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Indeed, in the spirit of new beginnings, scholars are encouraged to use the historical distance of the early twenty first century and the geographical and cultural distance of the Great South Land to reconceptualise the geographical and cultural field of Romantic studies.

We invite submissions covering the full range of possible meanings of “distance” in Romantic studies – including (but not limited to):

  • Transportation, travel, exploration, emigration, settlement, and repatriation
  • Transport, spiritual and material
  • Distances real and imagined: writing the remote in time and place and culture
  • The distance between social ranks or classes
  • Gender and race and generation distances
  • Linguistic distances, and cultural and textual translation
  • Generic distances: the hierarchies of art
  • Literature and science, literature and religion, science and religion
  • Overcoming distance: Romantic correspondence
  • The country and the city
  • The Romantic period itself as a strange country

Those interested in proposing 20-minute papers, or full panels of three speakers and a chair, should submit abstracts of between 250 and 400 words and a 150-word bio by 1 October 2010.

http://www.rsaa.net.au/
http://www.conference.rsaa.net.au/

CFP: MVSA: “Victorian Environments: Spaces, Places, Traces,” Kansas, April 2011

In Conferences on September 20, 2010 at 3:48 pm

Midwest Victorian Studies Association
Annual Conference
Washburn University, Topeka, Kansas
April 15-17, 2011

The theme for the Midwest Victorian Studies Conference’s thirty-fifth annual conference is “Victorian Environments: Spaces, Places, Traces.”  We invite submissions of papers covering the full range of possible meanings of the theme, including, but not limited to:

– urbanization and the shaping of place,
–gendered spaces,
–built environments,
–architecture and the decorative arts,
–ecology and relations with nature,
–musical, theatrical, and performance spaces,
–electoral and political spaces,
–gardens and landscapes,
–metropolitan/colonial spaces,
–the home and the pub,
–work spaces (the factory, the mine, the atelier),
–exhibitionary spaces (the Crystal Palace, the museum),
–the traces of vanished places (ruins, palimpsests).

The plenary address will be by Tim Barringer, Paul Mellon Professor of the History of Art at Yale University and the author of Men at Work: Art and Labour in Victorian Britain (2005),  Opulence and Anxiety: Landscape Painting from the Royal Academy of Arts (2007), and Reading the Pre-Raphaelites (1998), among other works. Another special feature of the conference will be tours of Topeka’s Victorian homes. Even if you do not submit a paper, we hope you will attend.

Those interested in proposing papers or full panels should submit 500-word abstracts and vitas by November 15, 2010 to the Midwest Victorian Studies Association’s email: conferencesubmissions@midwestvictorian.org; if you receive no reply, please re-send.
——————————

Victorianists studying and working in the midwestern or southern United States will want to make a home in this long-standing scholarly organization.  Graduate students are particularly welcome as attendees and presenters at MVSA conferences: conference fees are adjusted to make attendance more affordable, MVSA annually awards the Bill and Mary Burgan Prize for an outstanding paper by a graduate student at the conference, and the prestigious Arnstein Prize supports interdisciplinary dissertation research.  A new annual award for a first book by a Victorianist in the Midwest was inaugurated in 2008.

http://www.midwestvictorian.org

CFP: “Work and Leisure,” RS4VP Conference, Canterbury UK, July 2011

In Conferences on September 20, 2010 at 2:17 pm

Call for Papers

Work and Leisure


Research Society for Victorian Periodicals

43rd Annual Conference

Canterbury Christ Church University,  UK,

22 – 23 July 2011

Much of the nineteenth-century press was built on an interdependency of work and leisure. Texts designed for consumption in leisure hours were created by armies of workers: authors, illustrators and editors, of course, but also printers’ devils, water-colourists, photographers, ad agents, newsvendors, street sellers and a host of others. Who exactly were these labourers and how were they organised?

Then, what was the “leisure” that they promoted and how different was it from work? Reading the press is obviously an insufficient answer. Reading could be work for teachers, reviewers, proof-readers or those trying to entertain children or colleagues. To what extent, indeed, was leisure a ruse? How far did the Victorian press inscribe women’s domestic labour as a form of leisure, or male work as pleasurable? More generally, how did the press fit into the wider context of the entertainment industry: the theatre, travel, music, exhibitions, sport – and shopping?

Not all of the press was devoted to leisure and its limits. What of that enormous sector that unashamedly named their focus as work-related: the trade and professional press, newspaper pages devoted to the stock market and commodity prices, articles worrying over women in the workplace, over the masculinity of the civil servant, or over the demands of labourers on strike?

Finally, what of the “cultural work” of the nineteenth-century press? What was the function of the press in and on society? How might that cultural work relate to the pleasures of leisure?

Suggested themes include but are not limited to:

·         Technologies and economies of production, distribution and use

·         The cultural work of the Victorian press

·         Trade and professional publications

·         The nature and locations of labour and leisure

·         The culture industries, including travel, theatre, concerts, exhibitions, sport

·         Holiday Supplements

As always, the Research Society for Victorian Periodicals invites proposals for papers that address any aspect of nineteenth-century British magazines or newspapers, although those dealing with the conference theme are particularly welcome.

Please e-mail two-page (maximum) proposals for individual presentations or panels of three to Dr Clare Horrocks (C.L.Horrocks@ljmu.ac.uk) and Dr Andrew King (andrew.king@canterbury.ac.uk)

Please include a one-page C.V. with relevant publications, teaching, and/or coursework.  Final papers should take 15 minutes (20 minutes maximum) to present.  The deadline for submissions is February 1st 2011.

Journal of Victorian Culture Online: New Online Edition of JVC

In Digital resources on September 13, 2010 at 2:11 pm

The editorial board of the Journal of Victorian Culture is pleased to announce the creation and launch of its online edition, the Journal of Victorian Culture Online: http://myblogs.informa.com/jvc/

In addition to featuring some content from the print edition of the journal in the “Out Now” and “Coming Soon” sections, JVC Online hopes to support lively scholarly exchanges on the “Editor’s Blog” and “Reader’s Form” pages. The “Events” and “Resources” sections will keep scholars up-to-date on conferences, associations, and digital archives. Given popular culture’s interest in the nineteenth century, we have created the “Victorians Beyond the Academy” section to facilitate discussion of Victorian-related exhibits, films, television series, art, objects, comic books, and various other current cultural artifacts, ephemera, and events.

Embracing the participatory possibilities of digital publishing, we cordially invite the Victorian studies scholarly community to contribute to the site by posting original content and commenting on existing posts. We envision this site as a  dynamic and collegial virtual space, giving nineteenth century studies scholars a unique venue to consider new ideas and share insights. We look forward to your contributions and comments!

Best,
Lisa Hager
Online Editor

University of Wisconsin – Waukesha
1500 North University Dr.
Waukesha, WI 53188-2720
Office: 129 Westview
lisa.hager@uwc.edu || http://www.lisahager.net/
Second Life: LisaLucas Kaestner

CFP: “Novelties” in 19thC Literature and Culture (York, November 2010)

In Conferences on September 13, 2010 at 2:09 pm

Call for Papers –

Novelties: A One-Day Postgraduate Symposium on Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture

Keynote speaker: Regenia Gagnier

Saturday 27th November 2010, The Humanities Research Centre, Berrick Saul Building, University of York

The nineteenth century is frequently characterized as a period of extraordinary change, but Novelties asks what is still surprising about its literature and culture. The word ‘novelty’ has resonances in the modern and the unfamiliar, the innovative and the unusual; it expresses an ingenious solution, a remarkable device, a newsworthy occurrence, and everything that is frivolous, fashionable and disreputable. Novelties will showcase research that explores a ‘novel’ aspect of nineteenth-century Britain from anywhere on this spectrum, whether it’s political activism and social revolution, or public scandal and social climbing; scientific invention and pioneering travel, or phantasmagoria and commercial tourism. Novelties is a celebration of all things ‘new’ in the field of nineteenth-century literature and culture, from the freshly-decorated interior of the suburban villa to the darkest corners of the Victorian underworld. The symposium will also reflect our changing research culture by encouraging original and unexpected connections between disciplines.

Novelties will take place in the University’s brand-new Humanities Research Centre located on the main campus, just a short distance from York’s historic city centre. The city has excellent transportation links and is less than two hours from London by train.

We warmly invite proposals for 20-minute papers from postgraduates and early career researchers from literature, history, history of art, and any other branch of the humanities. Possible topics might include, but are not limited to:

•       Material culture
•       The news and newspapers
•       Advertising, the ‘commodity fetish’ and consumerism
•       Popular art forms and new genres
•       Sensations on the page and stage
•       Victorian invention and inventions
•       Space and architecture
•       Sexualities and psychologies
•       Victorian modernities and technologies

Abstracts of no more than 250 words should be submitted to Kate Compton (kec503@york.ac.uk) by 15th October 2010. Any other enquiries should be
sent to novelties@events.york.ac.uk.

For updates and further information, visit http://www.york.ac.uk/modernities/conferences/novelties/. Registration will open from Monday 25th October.

CFP: “Romanticism and the Tyrannies of Distance,” RSSA, Australia, February 2011

In Conferences on September 7, 2010 at 9:20 pm

Romanticism and the Tyrannies of Distance

10-12 February 2011
Call For Papers

Plenary speakers:

Deirdre Coleman (Melbourne)

Nicholas Roe ( St Andrews)

James Chandler (Chicago)

Panel:

Iain McCalman (Sydney)

Gillian Russell (ANU)

Clara Tuite (Melbourne)

Jon Mee (Warwickshire)

This is the first of the biennial conferences planned for the newly founded Romantic Studies Association of Australasia (RSAA), to take place at the University of Sydney from Thursday to Saturday, 10-12 February 2011.

THE EAST COAST of New Holland was discovered and mapped by Captain James Cook, its flora and fauna recorded and categorised by Joseph Banks and Daniel Solander, in the autumn of 1770, the same year that saw the births on the other side of the world of Wordsworth and Beethoven, making the origin and establishment of the modern Australian nation coincident with the origin and establishment of what we conventionally, if controversially, refer to as the Romantic period. This coincidence, though only one of a number of reasons for forming a confederation of Australasian Romanticists, is nonetheless a compelling one, and we invite scholars of the period from all over the world, as well as from Australia and New Zealand, to join us in marking and celebrating the foundation of the RSAA with a major scholarly event.

The theme of the conference will be ‘Romanticism and the Tyrannies of Distance’, after the Australian historian Geoffrey Blainey’s now classic account of the way the geographical remoteness of Australia has shaped its history and identity. From here, it is but a small step to seeing the way in which all kinds of distance – and the will to overcome distance – conditioned and challenged the writers and thinkers of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Indeed, in the spirit of new beginnings, scholars are encouraged to use the historical distance of the early twenty first century and the geographical and cultural distance of the Great South Land to reconceptualise the geographical and cultural field of Romantic studies.

Will Christie
University of Sydney
william.christie@sydney.edu.au

Plenary speakers:

Deirdre Coleman holds the Robert Wallace Chair of English at the University of Melbourne and is the author of Coleridge and The Friend, 1809-10 (Oxford, 1988) and Maiden Voyages and Infant Colonies: Two Women’s Travel Narratives of the 1790s (Leicester, 1999), and of the major study of Romantic Colonization and British Anti-Slavery (Cambridge, 2005). She is currently writing a biography of the flycatcher Henry Smeathman.

Nicholas Roe is Professor of English at the University of St Andrews, founding editor of the journal Romanticism, and the author of several other books that have helped shape the course of Romantic studies over the last twenty five years, beginning with Wordsworth and Coleridge: The Radical Years (Oxford, 1988), and including The Politics of Nature: William Wordsworth and Some Contemporaries (Basingstoke, 1992), Keats and History (Cambridge, 1995), John Keats and the Culture of Dissent (Oxford, 1997), and Fiery Heart: The First Life of Leigh Hunt (London, 2005). He is currently writing a new biography of John Keats for Yale University Press, and is Chair of the Keats House Foundation, Hampstead.

James Chandler is the Barbara E. & Richard J. Franke Distinguished Service Professor of English at the University of Chicago, author of two influential works of Romantic history and Romantic historicism, Wordsworth’s Second Nature: A Study of the Poetry and Politics (Chicago, 1984) and England in 1819: The Politics of Literary Culture and the Case of Romantic Historicism (Chicago, 1998), and has recently edited The New Cambridge History of English Romantic Literature (Cambridge, 2008).

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Panel discussion of ‘Romanticism In Australia’ with the assembled editors of The Oxford Companion To The Romantic Age (1999):

Iain McCalman, a Professorial Research Fellow and ARC Federation Fellow at the University of Sydney, is author of numerous studies of high and low culture in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, including Radical Underworld: Prophets, Revolutionaries, and Pornographers in London, 1795-1840 (Oxford, 1988), The Seven Ordeals of Count Cagliostro (London, 2003), and Darwin’s Armada: How four voyagers to Australasia won the battle for evolution and changed the world (Melbourne, London, New York, 2009).

Gillian Russell, an ARC Professorial Fellow at the Australian National University, is author of The Theatres of War: Performance, Politics, and Society, 1793-1815 (Oxford, 1995) and Women, Sociability and Theatre in Georgian Britain (Cambridge, 2007), and is co-editor (with Clara Tuite) of Romantic Sociability: Social Networks and Literary Culture in Britain, 1770- 1840 (Oxford, 2002).

Clara Tuite, an Associate Professor at the University of Melbourne, is author of Romantic Austen: Sexual Politics and the Literary Canon (Cambridge, 2002) and is co-editor (with Gillian Russell) of Romantic Sociability: Social Networks and Literary Culture in Britain, 1770- 1840 (Oxford, 2002) and (with Claudia L. Johnson) of The Blackwell Companion to Jane Austen (Oxford, 2008).

Jon Mee, Professor of Romanticism Studies at the University of Warwickshire, is the author of Dangerous Enthusiasm: William Blake and the Culture of Radicalism in the 1790s (Oxford, 1992) and Romanticism, Enthusiasm, and Regulation: Poetics and the Policing of Culture in the Romantic Period (Oxford, 2003), with Conversible Worlds: Literature and the Idea of Conversation in Eighteenth-Century and Romantic Period forthcoming, again from Oxford University Press.

Back to top of page

We invite submissions covering the full range of possible meanings of “distance” in Romantic studies – including (but not limited to)

  • Transportation, travel, exploration, emigration, settlement, and repatriation
  • Transport, spiritual and material
  • Distances real and imagined: writing the remote in time and place and culture
  • The distance between social ranks or classes
  • Gender and race and generation distances
  • Linguistic distances, and cultural and textual translation
  • Generic distances: the hierarchies of art
  • Literature and science, literature and religion, science and religion
  • Overcoming distance: Romantic correspondence
  • The country and the city
  • The Romantic period itself as a strange country

Those interested in proposing 20-minute papers, or full panels of three speakers and a chair, should submit abstracts of between 250 and 400 words and a 150-word bio by 1 October 2010. This can be done here.

CFP: Midwest Victorian Studies Association conference: “Victorian Environments,” April 2011

In Conferences on September 2, 2010 at 12:44 pm

CALL FOR PAPERS

Midwest Victorian Studies Association
Annual Conference

Washburn University, Topeka, Kansas
April 15-17, 2011

The theme for the Midwest Victorian Studies Association‘s thirty-fifth annual conference is “Victorian Environments: Spaces, Places, Traces.”  We invite submissions of papers covering the full range of possible meanings of the theme, including, but not limited to:

– urbanization and the shaping of place,
–gendered spaces,
–built environments,
–architecture and the decorative arts,
–ecology and relations with nature,
–musical, theatrical, and performance spaces,
–electoral and political spaces,
–gardens and landscapes,
–metropolitan/colonial spaces,
–the home and the pub,
–work spaces (the factory, the mine, the atelier),
–exhibitionary spaces (the Crystal Palace, the museum),
–the traces of vanished places (ruins, palimpsests).

The plenary address will be by Tim Barringer, Paul Mellon Professor of the History of Art at Yale University and the author of Men at Work: Art and Labour in Victorian Britain (2005),  Opulence and Anxiety: Landscape Painting from the Royal Academy of Arts (2007), and Reading the Pre-Raphaelites (1998), among other works.

Another special feature of the conference will be tours of Topeka’s Victorian homes. Even if you do not submit a paper, we hope you will attend.

Those interested in proposing papers or full panels should submit 500-word abstracts and vitas by November 15, 2010 to the Midwest Victorian Studies
Association’s email: conferencesubmissions@midwestvictorian.org; if you receive no reply, please re-send.
——————————-

Victorianists studying and working in the midwestern or southern United States will want to make a home in this long-standing scholarly organization.  Graduate students are particularly welcome as attendees and presenters at MVSA conferences: conference fees are adjusted to make attendance more affordable, MVSA annually awards the Bill and Mary Burgan Prize for an outstanding paper by a graduate student at the conference, and the prestigious Arnstein Prize supports interdisciplinary dissertation research.  A new annual award for a first book by a Victorianist in the Midwest was inaugurated in 2008.

http://www.midwestvictorian.org/

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