On 19th-Century Literary Scholarship

Archive for August, 2010|Monthly archive page

The Wordsworth Circle: Summer 2010 issue

In Articles on August 30, 2010 at 1:26 pm

THE WORDSWORTH CIRCLE

VOLUME XLI, NUMBER 3 Summer 2010

CONTENTS
THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF ROMANTICISM: 2009

Wordsworth’s Double-Take
William Galperin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123

“Antiquity! thou wondrous charm”: Lamb, Nostalgia and the Effable City
Simon Hull . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128

Cosmopolitan Flanerie: Leigh Hunt as Literary Cartographer
Charles Mahoney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

London’s Immortal Druggists: Pharmaceutical Science and Business in Romanticism
Thomas H. Schmid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134

Wollstonecraft and World Improvement
Mark Canuel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139

Mary Robinson and the Trouble with Tabitha Bramble
Daniel Robinson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

Egalitarianism in Mary Robinson’s Metropolis
William D. Brewer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146

Flash Romanticism: The Currency of Urban Knowledge in Tom & Jerry
Jonathan Farina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150

Gothic Chapbooks and the Urban Reader
Diane Long Hoeveler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155

The Ethnologists’ Bookshop: Bartlett & Welford in 1840s New York
Robert L. Gunn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159

The Forest and the City: Savagery and Civility in the British Atlantic World
Kevin Hutchings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164

John Galt, Happy Colonialist: The Case of The Apostate; or, Atlantis Destroyed
Jeffrey Cass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167

The City as Portal: Late Georgian Women on the Stage and in the Public Sphere
Marjean D. Purinton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171

CFP: “Decadent Poetics” conference at Exeter, July 2011

In Conferences on August 24, 2010 at 10:27 pm
CALL FOR PAPERS

Decadent Poetics


Centre for Victorian Studies,  University of Exeter, UK  –  1-2 July 2011

Deadline for proposals: 10 November 2010

Keynote speakers: Stephen Arata (Virginia), Joseph Bristow (UCLA),  Regenia Gagnier (Exeter), Catherine Maxwell (Queen Mary, London)
The initial reception of ‘decadent’ writing in both France and England was characterized by a focus on form and the importance of the poets of the late Roman Empire. From Theophile Gautier’s Preface to the 1868 edition of Baudelaire’s Les Fleurs du Mal to Arthur Symons’s ‘The Decadent Movement in Literature’ and Paul Borget’s famous delineation of decadent writing attempts to articulate a ‘decadent poetics’ were central to the definition of this new literature. Yet in recent years our understanding of decadence has been occluded by the focus on cultural politics and sexual transgression, which continue to dominate academic criticism of the fin de siècle. This conference seeks to return to the Victorian interest in language, poetics and form as the key to understanding decadence and aestheticism as literary phenomena. The focus here will be on both poetry and prose of the period and we particularly encourage those interested in marginal and forgotten writers of the period, along with the debates on the relationship between poetics and a culture in decline. In an attempt to outline a decadent poetics, we also seek to expand and complicate the canon of ‘’ecadent’ writers who dominate prevailing versions of the Victorian fin de siècle.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • education and language;
  • Victorians and Roman literature;
  • Decadent prosody;
  • Decadent and Modernist poetics;
  • Aestheticist poetics;
  • transatlantic Decadence;
  • fin-de-siècle philology/linguistics;
  • politics of Decadence and Aestheticism;
  • satires of Decadent form;
  • print/visual cultures of Decadence;
  • Decadence and new technologies;
  • genetic readings of Decadence;
  • archival Decadence;
  • material Decadence

Abstracts of 300-500 words should be sent to Dr Alex Murray and Dr Jason Hall via email at <decadent-poetics@exeter.ac.uk> by 10 November 2010.

Proposals for panels (comprising three speakers) are also welcome — please submit the title and a brief description of the panel as well as abstracts for the individual papers. Speakers (whether part of a proposed panel or not) are asked to include a one-page CV with full contact details, institutional affiliation (where applicable) and a list of relevant publications.

Update: More on “Useful & Beautiful: The Transatlantic Arts of William Morris and the Pre-Raphaelites” at Delaware

In Events on August 24, 2010 at 10:20 pm

“Useful & Beautiful: The Transatlantic Arts of William Morris and the Pre-Raphaelites”

University of Delaware
Winterthur Museum & Country Estate
Delaware Art Museum

7-9 October 2010

“Useful & Beautiful: The Transatlantic Arts of William Morris and the Pre-Raphaelites” will be the subject of a conference and related exhibitions to be held 7-9 October 2010 at the University of Delaware (Newark, DE) and at the Delaware Art Museum and the Winterthur Museum & Country Estate (Wilmington, DE). Organized with the assistance of the William Morris Society in the United States, “Useful & Beautiful” will highlight the strengths of the University of Delaware’s rare books, art, and manuscripts collections; Winterthur’s important holdings in American decorative arts; and the Delaware Art Museum’s superlative Pre-Raphaelite collection (the largest outside Britain). All events will focus on the multitude of transatlantic exchanges that involved Morris, the Pre-Raphaelites, and the Arts and Crafts and Aesthetic movements of the late nineteenth century.

In addition to sessions featuring internationally known scholars and experts, there will be a keynote lecture by noted biographer, Fred Kaplan; demonstrations by leading practitioners who make and design Arts and Crafts objects; special exhibitions; a concert of early music; and a performance of Oscar Wilde’s “The Importance of Being Earnest” by the University of Delaware’s critically acclaimed Resident Ensemble Players.

Registration fee: $150 or $75 for students. No fee for University of Delaware faculty, students, and staff.

Online registration and more information–including a list of speakers–is available at  www.udel.edu/conferences/uandb

Related exhibitions include:

DELAWARE ART MUSEUM
“A Belief in the Power of Beauty: A Selection of Work by May Morris (1862-1938)”
“On Assignment: American Illustration 1850-1950″
“Leonard Baskin: Art from the Gift of Alfred Appel, Jr.”
also permanent display of the Samuel and Mary R. Bancroft Collection of Pre-Raphaelite Art

DELAWARE CENTER FOR THE CONTEMPORARY ARTS
“David Mabb: The Morris Kitsch Archive”
“In Canon”

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE LIBRARY
“London Bound: American Writers in Britain, 1870-1916″
“The Multifaceted Mr. Morris”

OLD COLLEGE GALLERY, UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE
“Ethel Reed and American Graphic Design of the 1890s, From the Thomas G. Boss Collection”

HISTORIC COSTUME AND TEXTILE COLLECTION, ALISON HALL, UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE
Display of women’s fashions of the Aesthetic movement, from the University of Delaware’s Historic Costume & Textile Collection, Department of Fashion and Apparel Studies

“Useful & Beautiful” is supported by Delaware Art Museum; Winterthur Museum & Country Estate; Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts; William Morris Society in the United States; William Morris Society (UK); University of Delaware Library Associates; Faculty Senate Committee on Cultural Activities and Public Events; the following University of Delaware units, departments and programs: College of Arts and Sciences, University of Delaware, University of Delaware Library, Art, Art Conservation, Art History, English, Fashion and Apparel Studies, History, Institute for Global Studies, Frank and Yetta Chaiken Center for Jewish Studies, Center for Material Culture Studies, Music, Office of Equity and Inclusion, Resident Ensemble Players/Professional Theatre Training Program, University Museums, and Women’s Studies; Greater Wilmington Convention and Visitors Bureau; and Routledge Visual Arts Journals.

CFP: “Victorian Bodies and Machines” panel at NEMLA 2011

In Conferences on August 24, 2010 at 10:17 pm

Call for Papers

PANEL:

VICTORIAN BODIES AND MACHINES
42nd Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
April 7-10, 2011
New Brunswick, NJ – Hyatt New Brunswick
Host Institution: Rutgers University

This panel will examine representational and material relations between bodies and machines in the Victorian era. Papers may approach this topic from the direction of industrialization and economics to examine labor power; the laborer’s body as machine or appendage of the machine; or the effects of machine labor on the worker’s body, including factory accidents and developmental deformities. Specific Victorian technological innovations may be addressed through examination of scientific texts (or science fiction) and the ways new technologies are figured in relation with (or as extensions of) human bodies, including networks and human communications; prostheses and appendages; or robots and automatons. Papers may also examine the connections between machines and specific kinds of bodies (classed, gendered, etc.) or forms of embodiment (for example: How does the worker’s relation with the machine construct a specifically gendered and/or classed body?). In addition to texts of the Victorian era, the panel welcomes papers that examine relations between Victorian bodies and machines in Steampunk texts and contexts.

Please send 250-500 word abstracts to Jessica Kuskey   jekuskey@syr.edu
Deadline: September 30, 2010

Please include with your abstract:

Name and Affiliation
Email address
Postal address
Telephone number
A/V requirements (if any; $10 handling fee with registration)

The 42nd Annual Convention will feature approximately 360 sessions, as well as pre-conference workshops, dynamic speakers and cultural events. Details and the complete Call for Papers for the 2011 Convention will be posted in June: www.nemla.org.

Interested participants may submit abstracts to more than one NeMLA session; however panelists can only present one paper (panel or seminar). Convention participants may present a paper at a panel and also present at a creative session or participate in a roundtable. Do not accept a slot if you may cancel to present on another session.

Partial Answers Special Issue on 18th- and 19th-Century Women Writers

In Articles on August 17, 2010 at 9:29 am

PARTIAL ANSWERS: Journal of Literature and History of Ideas

Volume 8, Issue 2
June 2010
Editors: Yael Shapira and Miranda M. Yaggi (guest editors)


Contents

Introduction. Notes on a Margin : British Women Writers and Acts of Annotation
Yael Shapira and Miranda M. Yaggi (Volume 8, Issue 2, June 2010) : 229–34
Then and Now

“Women as the Sponsoring Category” : A Forum on Academic Feminism and British Women’s Writing
Ann Cvetkovich, Susan Fraiman, Susan Stanford Friedman, and Miranda M. Yaggi (Volume 8, Issue 2, June 2010) : 235–54
History of Humanities

“Speaking on the Edge of my Tomb” : The Epistolary Life and Death of Catherine Talbot
Celia Rasmussen (Volume 8, Issue 2, June 2010) : 255–75
Episodes in the History of Ideas

Conversations as Signifiers : Characters on the Margins of Morality in the First Three Novels of Frances Burney
Christina Davidson (Volume 8, Issue 2, June 2010) : 277–304
Literature and Ethics

Charlotte Smith’s Exilic Persona
Monica Smith-Hart (Volume 8, Issue 2, June 2010) : 305–323
Topoi

“Making the Prude” in Charlotte Brontë’s Villette
Julia Kent (Volume 8, Issue 2, June 2010) : 325–39
Topoi

Reinventing the Marian Persecutions in Victorian England
Miriam Elizabeth Burstein (Volume 8, Issue 2, June 2010) : 341–64
Literature and Ideology

Dorothy Sayers and the Case of the Shell-Shocked Detective
Ariela Freedman (Volume 8, Issue 2, June 2010) : 365–87
Narrative as a Way of Thinking

Rebecca West and the Meaning of Exile
Bernard Schweizer (Volume 8, Issue 2, June 2010) : 389–407
Topoi

Women Novelists and the Ethics of Desire, 1684–1814: In the Voice of Our Biblical Mothers, by Elizabeth Kraft
Jesse Molesworth (Volume 8, Issue 2, June 2010) : 409–412
Book review

Family Likeness: Sex, Marriage, and Incest from Jane Austen to Virginia Woolf, by Mary Jean Corbett
Elizabeth Rose Gruner (Volume 8, Issue 2, June 2010) : 412–14
Book review

Women Writers and Old Age in Great Britain, 1750–1850, by Devoney Looser
Roxanne Eberle (Volume 8, Issue 2, June 2010) : 414–17
Book review

Private Sphere to World Stage from Austen to Eliot, by Elizabeth Sabiston
Anne Mallory (Volume 8, Issue 2, June 2010) : 417–21
Book review

Women’s Literary Collaboration, Queerness, and Late-Victorian Culture by Jill R. Ehnenn
Lisa Hager (Volume 8, Issue 2, June 2010) : 421–24
Book review

CFP: 18th- & 19th-Century British Women Writers Conference, Ohio State, 3/31-4/3, 2011

In Conferences on August 16, 2010 at 10:17 am

The 19th Annual 18th- and 19th-Century British Women Writers Conference
The Ohio State University
Columbus, OH
http://bwwc2011.osu.edu/

“Curiosities”

March 31- April 3, 2011

Call for Papers:
The theme for this year’s conference is “Curiosities.” We encourage submissions that consider how the concept of curiosity—in its dual meaning of intellectual pursuit and particular material objects—influenced the lives and work of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century women writers, and continues to drive our scholarship today. We welcome interdisciplinary approaches to this topic, and are especially interested in both the ways in which women of this period expressed curiosity about their world through science, politics, philosophy, travel, religion, and art, and the ways in which these same questing, curious women became the subjects and objects of inquiry themselves.

Proposals for panels and individual papers might consider, but are not limited to, the following issues in women’s writing of the “long” eighteenth and nineteenth centuries:

Curious Explorations
• Travel writings/art; ethnographies
• Colonialism and Empire
• Immigration and emigration
• Adventure stories
• Self-exploration: memoir, autobiography, biography
• Imaginative Exploration: fantasy, dreams

Curious Bodies
• Maternity; Sexuality; Race and ethnicity
• Women and disability
• “Freak” studies
• Bodies on display: actresses, dancers , “public women”

Morbid Curiosity
• The Gothic
• Supernatural investigations; spiritualism; afterlife
• Scandal; roman à clef
• Bluebeard Tales: the “dangers” of female curiosity

Shameful Curiosities & Curious Feelings
• Suspense and Sensation
• Affect; Desire; Disgust
• Forbidden Texts/ Banned Books
• Pornography

Curiosity vs. Privacy
• Voyeurism and eavesdropping
• Gossip
• “Private” Genres: letters, diary, closet drama
• Epistolary novels
• The private sphere
• Private legacies: wills, estates, inheritance

Cabinets of Curiosities
• Collections and collectors
• Women and/as commodities
• Domestic objects
• Consumerism; shopping; possessions
• Exhibitions and museums

Curious Inquiries
• Science and medicine; The Case Study
• Education/ the pursuit of knowledge
• Philosophical and religious investigations
• “The Woman Question”
• Journalism
• Crime and investigation: women’s crime fiction; mystery writing; the
female detective
• Experimentation (artistic, scientific, personal)

**Note: The journal Prose Studies will be publishing a special issue based upon papers presented at this conference; therefore, we especially encourage proposals focusing on forms of non-fictional prose in addition to work on poetry, drama, fiction, etc.

Individual proposals should be two pages: a cover sheet including name, presentation title, university affiliation, address, e-mail address, phone number, and brief biographical paragraph; and a 500-word abstract.

Panel proposals should include a coversheet—including panel title, presenters’ names, presentation titles, university affiliations, addresses, e-mail addresses, phone numbers, brief biographical paragraphs, and the name of a moderator—followed by separate abstracts (500-word) that describe the significance of the panel topic and each presentation.

Please do not include any identifying information on the abstracts.Proposals must be submitted electronically as an attachment in .doc or .rtf format by Nov. 1, 2010 to the conference e-mail address at: bwwc2011@gmail.com

New issue: Nineteenth-Century Gender Studies 6:2, on 19C Feminisms

In Articles on August 16, 2010 at 9:31 am

Issue 6.2 of Nineteenth-Century Gender Studies is now available at www.ncgsjournal.com

This special issue, “Nineteenth-Century Feminisms: Press & Platform,” is guest edited by Susan Hamilton and Janice Schroeder.

The issue features the following articles and reviews:

Articles

Reviews

  • Christopher L. Reese, “Institutional Periodical Identities?” Review of Mark Schoenfield’s British Periodicals and Romantic Identity: The “Literary Lower Empire.”
  • Nicole Fluhr, “Affairs of State: Aristocratic Women and the Politics of Influence.” Review of Muireann Ó’Cinnéide’s Aristocratic Women and the Literary Nation, 1832-1867.
  • Chris Vanden Bossche, “Reading Reynolds’ Radicalism.” Review of Anne Humpherys and Louis James, eds. G. W. M. Reynolds: Nineteenth-Century Fiction, Politics, and the Press.
  • Linda K. Hughes, “Strategic Authorship: Revising Histories of Women’s Writing.” Review of Linda Peterson’s Becoming a Woman of Letters: Myths of Authorship and Facts of the Victorian Market.
  • Joanna Shawn Brigid O’Leary, “Tales of Fancy and the Politics of the Periodical.” Review of Caroline Sumpter’s The Victorian Press and the Fairy Tale.
  • Jill Galvan, “Black, White, and Read All Over: Novels and News in the Victorian Age.” Review of Matthew Rubery’s The Novelty of Newspapers: Victorian Fiction after the Invention of the News.

Back issues of NCGS are also available free online.

CFP: INCS 2011: “Speaking Nature” at Pitzer College, 3/31 – 4/3

In Conferences on August 15, 2010 at 10:47 am

CALL FOR PAPERS:

SPEAKING NATURE

INTERDISCIPLINARY NINETEENTH-CENTURY STUDIES CONFERENCE
Pitzer College, Claremont, CA (March 31-April 3, 2011)
How did the nineteenth century conceive, construct, and represent the physical world?  In what ways did nature as an ideology and/or material reality shape the nineteenth century?  How did the nineteenth century understand the relation of human beings to nature?  The 2011 Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies (INCS) Conference invites proposals that investigate any aspect of this topic from multiple interdisciplinary perspectives, including and/or integrating Literature, History, Science, Art History, Environmental Studies, Law,
Philosophy, Sociology, Anthropology, Music, Economics, and Theology.

Topics may include (but are not limited to):

·       human nature
·       animal nature
·       plant nature
·       gender & nature
·       empire & nature
·       anatomy, medicine, health
·       Nature’s language
·       laws of nature
·       environmentalism & sustainability
·       natural disasters & catastrophes
·       natural frontiers
·       wilderness & gardens
·       cities & ruins
·       violent /nurturing nature
·       new worlds, lost worlds, our world
·       landscapes, oceans, deserts
·       conquest of nature
·       nature & antiquity
·       nature & art
·       nature & technology
·       nature & the sciences
·       nature & human responsibility
·       nature & the disciplines

The conference will be held at Pitzer College, a member of the Claremont Colleges in Claremont, California.

Please submit 250-word abstracts by November 1, 2010 to incs2011@pitzer.edu or to sumangala_bhattacharya@pitzer.edu.

For more information on INCS, see www.nd.edu/~incshp/.  Selected conference papers will be published in Nineteenth-Century Contexts.

New Issue of Victorian Literature and Culture (September 2010) Available

In Articles on August 11, 2010 at 8:55 am

VICTORIAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE

Volume 38 – Issue 02 – September 2010

PDF version of this Table of Contents

ADVERTISING AND FICTION IN THE PICKWICK PAPERS

Andy Williams

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 38, Issue 02, September 2010, pp 319 – 335

[ abstract ]

BREAKING THE IDOL OF THE MARRIAGE PLOT IN YEAST AND VILLETTE

Timothy L. Carens

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 38, Issue 02, September 2010, pp 337 – 353

[ abstract ]

ADVANCED CONSERVATIVE LIBERALISM: PARTY AND PRINCIPLE IN TROLLOPE’S PARLIAMENTARY NOVELS

David M. Craig

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 38, Issue 02, September 2010, pp 355 – 371

[ abstract ]

“GREATLY ALTERED”: THE LIFE OF SYDNEY OWENSON’S INDIAN NOVEL

Cóilín Parsons

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 38, Issue 02, September 2010, pp 373 – 385

[ abstract ]

Editors’ Topic: Victorian Cosmopolitanisms
VICTORIAN COSMOPOLITANISMS: INTRODUCTION

Tanya Agathocleous, Jason R. Rudy

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 38, Issue 02, September 2010, pp 389 – 397

[ abstract ]

COSMOPOLITANISM’S ACTUALLY EXISTING BEYOND; TOWARD A VICTORIAN GEOPOLITICAL AESTHETIC

Lauren M. E. Goodlad

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 38, Issue 02, September 2010, pp 399 – 411

[ abstract ]

“THE COUNTRY OF THE PLAGUE”: ANTICULTURE AND AUTOETHNOGRAPHY IN DICKENS’S 1850S

James Buzard

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 38, Issue 02, September 2010, pp 413 – 419

[ abstract ]

VICTORIAN COSMOPOLITANISM, INTERRUPTED

Bruce Robbins

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 38, Issue 02, September 2010, pp 421 – 425

[ abstract ]

COSMOPOLITANISM, FEMINISM, AND THE MOVING BODY

Judith R. Walkowitz

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 38, Issue 02, September 2010, pp 427 – 449

[ abstract ]

ANTI-SLAVERY COSMOPOLITANISM IN THE BLACK ATLANTIC

Edlie Wong

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 38, Issue 02, September 2010, pp 451 – 466

[ abstract ]

MATTHEW ARNOLD AND RELIGION’S COSMOPOLITAN HISTORIES

Sebastian Lecourt

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 38, Issue 02, September 2010, pp 467 – 487

[ abstract ]

UNSPEAKABLE GEORGE ELIOT

David Kurnick

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 38, Issue 02, September 2010, pp 489 – 509

[ abstract ]

MEDICAL COSMOPOLITANISM: MIDDLEMARCH, CHOLERA, AND THE PATHOLOGIES OF ENGLISH MASCULINITY

Mary Wilson Carpenter

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 38, Issue 02, September 2010, pp 511 – 528

[ abstract ]

RELUCTANT COSMOPOLITANISM IN DICKENS’S GREAT EXPECTATIONS

John McBratney

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 38, Issue 02, September 2010, pp 529 – 546

[ abstract ]

RULE BOHEMIA: THE COSMOPOLITICS OF SUBCULTURE IN GEORGE DU MAURIER’S TRILBY

Kimberly J. Stern

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 38, Issue 02, September 2010, pp 547 – 570

[ abstract ]


THE COSMOPOLITAN NATIONALISM OF SAROJINI NAIDU, NIGHTINGALE OF INDIA

Sheshalatha Reddy

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 38, Issue 02, September 2010, pp 571 – 589

[ abstract ]


GOOD EUROPEANS AND NEO-LIBERAL COSMOPOLITANS: ETHICS AND POLITICS IN LATE VICTORIAN AND CONTEMPORARY COSMOPOLITANISM

Regenia Gagnier

Victorian Literature and Culture, Volume 38, Issue 02, September 2010, pp 591 – 614

[ abstract ]

CFP: NVSA Conference: “Systems and Archives” at Maryland, April 15-17, 2011

In Conferences on August 9, 2010 at 10:37 am

The Northeastern Victorian Studies Association (NVSA) solicits submissions for its annual conference to be held at the University of Maryland, April 15-17, 2011.

The topic this year is SYSTEMS AND ARCHIVES.

The Northeast Victorian Studies Association calls for papers considering the ways Victorians organized information, knowledge, concepts, phenomena, and materials. They classified, categorized, connected, synthesized, and unified; they constructed technological, conceptual, and theoretical systems; they archived historical records and artifacts. This year’s conference will take up that Victorian systematizing, its forms of organization and its explanatory structures. What kind of systems and systematic thinking were developed in the period? What is distinctive about Victorian approaches to systems? How and why did Victorians arrange, record, and store information? What are the metaphors of systems? What kind of subjects generated archives and what were the principles of organization? What constitutes an archive and is an archive always a system? And how and why were systems resisted? We especially seek papers that reflect upon the nature, conceptions, and representation of systems and archives.

See NVSA website for more information: http://web.stonehill.edu/nvsa/

Proposals (no more than 500 words) by Oct. 15, 2010 (e-mail submissionsonly, please):

Professor Tanya Agathocleous, Chair, NVSA Program Committee,(tagathoc@hunter.cuny.edu).

Please note: all submissions to NVSA are evaluated anonymously.

Successful proposals will stay within the 500-word limit and make a compelling case for the talk and its relation to the conference topic.

Please do not send complete papers, and do not include your name on the proposal.

Please do include your name, institutional and email addresses, and proposal title in a cover letter. Papers should take 15 minutes (20 minutes maximum) so as to provide ample time for discussion.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 198 other followers