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CFP Reminder: BAVS 2010, University of Glasgow, September 2-4 2010

In Conferences on February 26, 2010 at 10:57 am

This a reminder that proposals to the 2010 British Association for Victorian Studies Conference, to be held at the University of Glasgow, September 2-4, 2010, are due on March 15. We look forward to receiving your proposals.

Call for papers: ‘Victorian Forms and Formations’

The world is full of crystals. Swift, or slow,
Or dark, or bright their varying formation;
From pure calm heights of fair untrodden snow
To fire-wrought depths of earliest creation.
And life is full of crystals; forming still
In myriad-shaped results from good and seeming ill.
– Frances Ridley Havergal, ‘Life-Crystals’ from The Poetical Works
The 2010 BAVS conference seeks to address the question of ‘form’, in all its varied meanings, in Victorian culture. We invite papers that address the topic of literary form, and that engage with current debates in the field over the return to form in literary criticism, but also wish to broaden the topic to encompass forms and formations in other disciplines, including but not limited to art history, science, architecture, politics, religion and history of the book. Papers might consider the role of different social and political groupings and institutions in the Victorian period, or the formation of a particular idea or discipline. They might deal with wide-ranging debates over varied attempts at reform in the nineteenth century, or could focus on the formation or reformation of the individual. Papers considering material forms, including the fashioning of the body in medical and other discourse, are welcome, as are papers on the physical features of the Victorian landscape: urban and rural spaces, natural forms and the built environment. We also invite papers that are concerned with the reworking of Victorian forms in twentieth and twenty-first century literature and culture.

Plenary speakers:
James Eli Adams
Matthew Campbell
Margaret Macdonald
Catherine Robson

A number of postgraduate bursaries will be available for postgraduate students presenting a paper at the conference or acting as a conference reporter. Please check this site in spring 2010 for details of how to apply.
Deadline for submission of abstract: 15 March 2010
Please send a 200-word abstract to bavs@arts.gla.ac.uk

Suggested topics for consideration:
Poetic form* Narrative form* Generic formation* Neoformalism*  Political formations* Social reform* Educational reform* Scientific formations* Geological forms*  Religious formations* Imperial formations* Urban forms* Architectural form* Sculptural form* Domestic design* Intellectual formations* Forms of publication* Bodily formations* Gendered forms* Forms of conduct* Forming identities*  Moral forms*Neovictorian forms*

CFP: “Romanticism & Evolution,” University of Western Ontario, 12-14 May, 2011

In Conferences on February 23, 2010 at 12:43 pm

Conference website (which is beautiful):

http://www.uwo.ca/english/evolution/

The Romanticism Research Group at The University of Western Ontario invites paper and special session proposals for an international conference, “Romanticism & Evolution.” The meeting will convene at Windermere Manor next to Western’s main campus in London, Ontario, from 12 – 14 May 2011. To view the conference poster, please
click here

Keynote speakers will be:

  • Gillian Beer (Cambridge University)
  • Tilottama Rajan (University of Western Ontario)
  • Robert J. Richards (University of Chicago)

Background

Though Romanticism is often imagined as the “age of revolution,” recent criticism has seen renewed interest in the general theme of “Romantic Evolution,” including the resurgence of such topics as organicism, vitalism, natural history, and natural philosophy. The objective of “Romanticism & Evolution” is to defamiliarize prevailing notions of evolution by tracing their origins to literary and scientific discourses of the transitional period 1775-1850, a time that witnessed the genesis of the modern idea of “literature” alongside the emergence of specialized disciplines, such as geology, biology, physiology, chemistry, psychology, and anthropology. Disenchanted with mechanistic science and Enlightenment rationalism, Romanticism also introduced a new organic image of the world, which displaced the older atomistic and static idea of nature with one that was dynamic and evolutionary. However, whether the organic mode of explanation replaced the mechanical philosophy as a radically incommensurable paradigm, or whether both coexisted in creative tension during and beyond the Romantic period, remains a matter for debate.
Revisiting important events and developments in the history of evolution prior to the publication of The Origin of Species, “Romanticism & Evolution” will focus critical attention on earlier, less recognized theories of change and transformation emerging in the cultural, literary, philosophical, and scientific debates of the Romantic period. Instead of searching through eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century science for “forerunners” to the Darwinian revolution, this conference aims to explore British and European Romanticism’s liminal position between the classical idea of an immutable “great chain of being” and the rise of modern discourses of historiography.

Suggested paper topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Collections, Museums, Gardens, Cabinets, and Natural History
  • Philosophies of Nature and Romantic Biology
  • Aesthetics and Poetics in light of Evolution
  • Literatures of Revolution, Evolution and Romantic Science
  • Romantic Ecology and Ecocriticism
  • The Pantheism Crisis, Naturphilosophie and the Romanticization of Spinoza
  • Colonialism, Imperialism, and Travel Narratives
  • Theories of the earth and the rise of the science of geology
  • Morality, Ethics, Affect, and the Scottish Enlightenment
  • Disaster, Catastrophe, and Natural Revolution
  • Romantic Vitalism, Organicism and Emergent Evolution
  • Theories of Preformationism, Epigenesis and Descent
  • Discourses of Sensibility, Excitability, Irritability
  • Sex, Gender, and Reproduction
  • Romantic Theologies, Creationism, and Intelligent Design
  • Genealogy, Archaeology, and Contemporary Theories of Change
  • Universal History, Cosmology, Natural Law, and Universal Peace
  • Germs, Disease, Illness, and Contagion
  • Theories of Race, Nationality, and Ethnicity
  • Romantic Animals, Mutation, and Monstrosity

Proposals for papers and sessions should be limited to 500 words. The deadline for the submission of abstracts for 20-minute presentations is 1 October 2010. Please include with your paper or session proposal, your name, e-mail address, and institutional affiliation. Abstracts should be e-mailed to romanticism@uwo.ca

© 2009 The University Of Western Ontario — Department of English

CFP: “Victorian Epidemics” conference, VSAWC, April 2011

In Conferences on February 21, 2010 at 10:41 am

(via Kristen Guest at the University of Northern British Columbia)

Victorian Epidemics
Victorian Studies Association of Western Canada
Banff, Alberta April 29-30, 2011

Keynote speaker: Pamela Gilbert, Albert Brick Professor of English, University of Florida Dr. Gilbert has published widely in the areas of Victorian literature, cultural studies and the history of medicine. Her first book, Disease, Desire and the Body in Victorian Women’s Popular Novels, was published by Cambridge University Press in 1997, followed by Mapping the Victorian Social Body (SUNY Press, 2004) and The Citizen’s Body (Ohio State University Press, 2007), and Cholera and Nation (SUNY Press, 2008).

This international conference will bring together specialists in Victorian art history, history, gender studies, science, and literature to contemplate the theme of disease in Victorian England and its colonies. Papers will address medical and social histories of disease, literary and artistic representations of disease, and disease as metaphor in Victorian culture.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:
-Victorian plagues: cholera, TB, venereal disease, influenza, smallpox
-histories and narratives of disease
-identity and pathology
-disease and the body
-disease as metaphor, languages of disease, contagion, illness
-disease and colonization, disease and globalization
-art as disease, mass culture as disease
-the spread of commercialism
-visual and literary representations of disease and illness
-sewers, filth, miasma
-slums, prostitution
-health and hygiene
-representations of illness
-mental illness
-imperial anxiety and disease

Please submit a 500 word abstract and short (50-75 word bio) by September 15 to Kristen Guest, Program Chair, kguest@unbc.ca

The conference will take place in Banff, Alberta in the heart of the Canadian Rockies. The town of Banff is surrounded by the spectacular scenery of Banff National Park, which offers excellent opportunities for both hiking and downhill skiing in late April. Banff is approximately one hour from Calgary and is easily accessible by car or air (regular and reasonably priced shuttles are available from Calgary International Airport).

Accommodations and sessions will be held in the Banff Park Lodge.

Reminder: CFP International Byron Conference, “Byron and the Book”

In Conferences on February 18, 2010 at 8:33 am

“Byron and the Book”
The 36th International Byron Society Conference,

Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

26-31 July 2010

Keynote speakers (to date):

Peter Graham, Virginia Tech (The Leslie A. Marchand Memorial Lecture)

Susan Wolfson, Princeton University

DEADLINE for submission of abstracts:  MARCH 15, 2010

PLEASE VISIT THE CONFERENCE INFORMATION WEBSITE:

http://byronsociety.wordpress.com/

MLA 2011 CFPs: Romantic topics

In Conferences on February 16, 2010 at 6:20 pm

The following sessions at the 2011 MLA may be of particular interest to scholars of British Romanticism:

____________________

Session Type: Allied Organization

Organization: North American Society for the Study of Romanticism

Title: Thinking through Form: Romantic Biography

Description: Aims and possibilities of biography in the Romantic moment, when art was often made of life and “the life” was a new form of art.

Submission Requirements: 250-word abstracts   Deadline: 15 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Denise Gigante (dgigante@stanford.edu)

__________________________

Session Type: Allied Organization

Organization: Wordsworth-Coleridge Association

Title: British Romanticism and Film

Description: Essays should examine the representation of Romantic literature, authors, and themes in film, with critical attention to production values, historical context, and film as a discrete artistic medium.

Submission Requirements: Abstracts   Deadline: 15 Mar. 2010

Organizer: James C. McKusick (james.mckusick@umontana.edu)

______________________

Session Type: Division

Organization: the English Romantic Period

Title: Locating Romantic Sociability

Description: Romantic-period writing in relation to particular scenes of sociability such as taverns, theaters, clubs, debating societies, shops, galleries, schools, pleasure gardens, chapels, drawing rooms.

Submission Requirements: 250-word abstracts   Deadline: 1 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Kevin Gilmartin (kmg@hss.caltech.edu)

____________________

Session Type: Division

Organization: the English Romantic Period

Title: Stepping Westward

Description: A westward romanticism? or step aside from a westward orientation? What distance–step, ocean, continent–makes a difference? Consider directionality, dialect, gait, measure; propositional, prepositional, topographical romanticisms; Romanticism’s “wildish destinies.”

Submission Requirements: Papers or abstracts   Deadline: 1 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Celeste Langan (clangan@berkeley.edu)

____________________

Session Type: Allied Organization

Organization: Byron Society of America

Title: Lord Byron: Lives and Afterlives

Description: Byron’s narrative or autobiographical impulses, 19th-century “lives,” or contemporary incarnations.

Submission Requirements: 8-page papers or 250-word proposals   Deadline: 15 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Cheryl Fallon Giuliano (giuliano@humnet.ucla.edu)

__________________________

Session Type: Special Session

Organization: n/a

Title: Romantic Agrarian Politics

Description: Rethinking connections between Romantic authors and agrarian resistance(s) to encroachment, dispossession, and enslavement. Transatlantic studies are especially welcome.

Submission Requirements: 250–500-word abstracts   Deadline: 10 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Michael Demson (mdemson@earthlink.net)

_____________________

Session Type: Division

Organization: Comparative Studies in Romanticism and the Nineteenth Century

Title: Forms of Freedom

Description: The actuality and idea of freedom in relation to the freedom or unfreedom of the kinds of texts that engage it.

Submission Requirements: Papers or abstracts   Deadline: 15 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Ian Balfour (ibalfour@yorku.ca)

_________________

Session Type: Division

Organization: Comparative Studies in Romanticism and the Nineteenth Century

Title: Genre Trouble

Description: 19th-century works that challenge genre definitions, transgress genre boundaries, exhibit formal heterogeneity; fragments and digressions.

Submission Requirements: Abstracts   Deadline: 15 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Michal Ginsburg (m-ginsburg@northwestern.edu)

_____________________

Session Type: Division

Organization: Comparative Studies in Romanticism and the Nineteenth Century

Title: Readings of Barbara Johnson’s 19th Century

Description: Readings of and with Johnson’s 19th century (Melville, Freud, Wordsworth, Baudelaire, Mallarme, etc.).

Submission Requirements: Abstracts   Deadline: 5 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Sara Guyer (guyer@wisc.edu)

___________________

Session Type: Allied Organization

Organization: Goethe Society of North America

Title: Self and Self-Consciousness (Selbstbewußtsein) in Goethe and Romanticism

Description: Exploring possible meanings of a “self” (self-awareness, knowledge of another self, etc.); also concepts Goethe and others employ to portray self-consciousness.

Submission Requirements: 1-page abstracts   Deadline: 10 Mar. 2010

Organizer: R. Ellis Dye (dye@macalester.edu)

___________________

Session Type: Special Session

Organization: n/a

Title: Romanticism and Globalization

Description: In the decades between the French Revolution and the “official” Victorian phase of the British Empire, how did British Romantics begin to teach their readers to think globally?

Submission Requirements: Abstracts   Deadline: 2 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Evan M. Gottlieb (evan.gottlieb@oregonstate.edu)

MLA 2011 CFPs: Victorian topics

In Conferences on February 16, 2010 at 10:21 am

The following Calls for Papers for the 2011 MLA Convention in Los Angeles are of potential interest to Victorian scholars:

_________________________________________

Session Type: Allied Organization

Organization: Dickens Society

Title: Adapting Dickens

Description: Papers exploring adaptations of Dickens’s novels across time and media, from stage and film to neo-Victorian fiction and contemporary, even commercial, incarnations.

Submission Requirements: 250-word abstracts   Deadline: 8 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Marty Gould (mgould@cas.usf.edu)

—————–

Session Type: Allied Organization

Organization: Dickens Society

Title: Dickens and Psychoanalysis

Description: New psychoanalytic approaches to Dickens. Papers on trauma, dissociation, dreams, hallucinatory states, unconscious memory; on Victorian theories of mind: double consciousness, mesmerism, physiognomy. Novels as case studies.

Submission Requirements: 250-word abstracts   Deadline: 15 Mar. 2010

Organizer: John Jordan (picasso@ucsc.edu)

———————–

Session Type: Allied Organization

Organization: William Morris Society

Title: Pre-Raphaelite Uses of the Past

Description: Collaborative session with the Arthurian Literature Society: papers on Victorian medievalism in painting, book design, literature, translation, and other genres.

Submission Requirements: Abstracts or proposals   Deadline: 20 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Florence S. Boos (florence-boos@uiowa.edu) and Michelle Warren (michelle.r.warren@dartmouth.edu)

———————-

Session Type: Division

Organization: Late-Nineteenth- and Early-Twentieth-Century English Literature

Title: Victorian Woolf

Description: Woolf’s Victorians and Victorianisms, her debts to Victorian contexts, sources, and precursors; her modernism reframed, denied, or backdated; her late- or neo-Victorian politics, technologies, travels, and afterlives.

Submission Requirements: 250-word abstracts   Deadline: 1 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Jesse E. Matz (matzj@kenyon.edu)

————————

Session Type: Division

Organization: the Victorian Period

Title: Victorian Form: Bad Form

Description: Betrayal, disappointment, misbehavior, subversion, the aesthetic as a problem, the conventions of bad behavior, the pressures of convention, the ethics of transgression.

Submission Requirements: 250–350-word abstracts   Deadline: 6 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Jonah Sebastian Siegel (jsiegel@rci.rutgers.edu)

————————

Session Type: Division

Organization: the Victorian Period

Title: Victorian Form: Good Form

Description: Form as an ethical, epistemological, or aesthetic concern. Topics might include loyalty; poetic, narrative, and taxonomic conventions; harmony, symmetry, manners–and relations among these.

Submission Requirements: 250–350-word abstracts   Deadline: 6 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Jonah Sebastian Siegel (jsiegel@rci.rutgers.edu)

—————————-

Session Type: Special Session

Organization: n/a

Title: Ancient Rome and the Victorian Novel

Description: Exploring the aesthetic and poetological relevance of ancient Roman literature (e.g., Lucretius, Ovid, and Vergil) for the Victorian novel and Victorian novelists.

Submission Requirements: 250-word abstracts   Deadline: 5 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Wolfram R. Keller (wolfram.keller@staff.hu-berlin.de)

—————————-

Session Type: Special Session

Organization: n/a

Title: Exploring Victorian Subjectivity: Nineteenth-Century British Diaries

Description: Examples of private and published 19th-century British diary writing. Work with manuscript materials especially welcome.

Submission Requirements: 500-word abstracts   Deadline: 2 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Lynn M. Linder (linderlm@slu.edu)

—————————

Session Type: Special Session

Organization: n/a

Title: Institutions of Victorian Literature

Description: Relations among Victorian Britain’s sprawling bureaucracies, its more intimate institutions (hearth and home), its literature, and the culture in which they flourish.

Submission Requirements: 300–500-word abstracts   Deadline: 2 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Matthew Dubord (mdubord@ucla.edu)

——————————

Session Type: Special Session

Organization: n/a

Title: Romanticism and Globalization

Description: In the decades between the French Revolution and the “official” Victorian phase of the British Empire, how did British Romantics begin to teach their readers to think globally?

Submission Requirements: Abstracts   Deadline: 2 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Evan M. Gottlieb (evan.gottlieb@oregonstate.edu)

—————————-

Session Type: Special Session

Organization: n/a

Title: Victorian Cultivations

Description: The intersection of environmental and social cultivation in 19th-century Britain, in either colonial or domestic contexts.

Submission Requirements: 350-word abstracts   Deadline: 2 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Elizabeth Chang (change@missouri.edu)

—————————-

Session Type: Special Session

Organization: n/a

Title: Victorian Ephebophilia: Men, Boys, and Literary Culture

Description: Why did Victorian writers express increasing interest in the aesthetic and erotic desirability of young males?

Submission Requirements: 200–350-word abstracts   Deadline: 8 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Joseph Eugene Bristow (jbristow@humnet.ucla.edu)

—————————

Session Type: Special Session

Organization: n/a

Title: Victorians and Continental Politics

Description: How did Victorian writers respond to such continental political events as the revolutions of 1848, the Risorgimento, and the Commune? Papers on continental political figures also welcome.

Submission Requirements: 300-word abstracts   Deadline: 15 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Lanya Lamouria (llamouria@missouristate.edu)

—————————-

Session Type: Special Session

Organization: n/a

Title: Writing the 19th-Century City

Description: The flaneur. Urban mysteries. The flash press. Styles of urban journalism. Women writing the city. Public and private spaces. Links between city and nature writing.

Submission Requirements: Proposals and short vitae   Deadline: 21 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Jeffrey Allen Steele (jsteele@wisc.edu)

——————————-

Session Type: Special Session

Organization: n/a

Title: Nineteenth-Century Self-Writing and Social Service

Description: Examining the intersection of self-writing, social vocation, and ethics in 19th-century British and American autobiography by women.

Submission Requirements: 250-word abstracts and vitae   Deadline: 10 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Bryan Rasmussen (brasmuss@callutheran.edu)

—————————–

Session Type: Special Session

Organization: n/a

Title: Jane Austen Goes Abroad

Description: Austen’s novels have traveled beyond English borders. Examining her reception around the globe from the 19th century to the present.

Submission Requirements: 300-word abstracts, vitae   Deadline: 20 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Sandra Alagona (sandra.alagona@cgu.edu)

————————–

Session Type: Special Session

Organization: n/a

Title: Empire, Time, Aesthetics

Description: What are distinctive forms of temporality or historicity that characterize politics of empire, imperialism, colonialism, and neoliberal globalization from 19th-century to present? Papers on chronopolitics, media and memory, speed, monuments, futurity, duration, etc.

Submission Requirements: Abstracts   Deadline: 15 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Mike Frangos (mfrangos@umail.ucsb.edu) and Susan Cook (susan.elizabeth.cook@gmail.com)

—————————

Session Type: Allied Organization

Organization: Byron Society of America

Title: Lord Byron: Lives and Afterlives

Description: Byron’s narrative or autobiographical impulses, 19th-century “lives,” or contemporary incarnations.

Submission Requirements: 8-page papers or 250-word proposals   Deadline: 15 Mar. 2010

Organizer: Cheryl Fallon Giuliano (giuliano@humnet.ucla.edu)

“Blake in Our Time” at U Toronto, August 2010

In Conferences on February 11, 2010 at 10:20 pm

Blake in Our Time, 28 August 2010 at Victoria University in the University of Toronto, will celebrate “the future of Blake studies and the legacy of G. E. Bentley, Jr.”  According to the conference poster, an exhibition and symposium will explore new directions and approaches to the study of Blake using manuscript archives, online resources, forgeries and oddities, variations in Blake’s illuminated books, Blake’s commercial engravings, and the major collections amassed by private scholar-collectors.  Speakers will include Robert N. Essick, Joseph Viscomi, Mary Lynn Johnson, and Angus Whitehead. The day will feature a series of short illustrated papers and illustrated panel presentations in an open forum.  For information, or to make a proposal for the panel presentations, please contact Karen Mulhallen, Ryerson University, kmulhall@ryerson.ca

New Books in 19th-Century Studies from Pickering and Chatto

In Books on February 1, 2010 at 11:13 am

The following titles relevant to Nineteenth-Century Studies have recently been published by Pickering and Chatto:

Blasphemy in Britain and America, 1800-1930
www.pickeringchatto.com/blasphemy

The Collected Letters of Ellen Terry
www.pickeringchatto.com/terry

New Woman Fiction, 1881-1899
www.pickeringchatto.com/newwoman

Regionalizing Science: Placing Knowledges in Victorian England
www.pickeringchatto.com/regionalizing

Rural Unwed Mothers: An American Experience, 1870-1950
www.pickeringchatto.com/unwed

The Works of Elizabeth Barrett Browning
www.pickeringchatto.com/barrettbrowning

The Language of Whiggism: Liberty and Patriotism, 1802-1830
www.pickeringchatto.com/whiggism

English Catholics and the Education of the Poor, 1847-1902
www.pickeringchatto.com/englishcatholics

Public Execution in England, 1573-1868
www.pickeringchatto.com/execution

Fictions of Dissent: Reclaiming Authority in Transatlantic Women’s
Writing of the Late Nineteenth Century
www.pickeringchatto.com/dissent

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